Argentina heart attack death rate nearly halved over 15 years

October 04, 2012

The 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology takes place 5 to 7 October 2012 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The event is organised by the Argentine Society of Cardiology, which is an affiliated member of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)(2). The ESC will present a full day of scientific sessions at the event, on Saturday 6 October, as part of its Global Scientific Activities (GSA) programme. ESC Past-President Michel Komajda will head the European delegation.

Myocardial infarction remains one of the top causes of death in Argentina. According to results from the SCAR registry, the mortality rate of patients hospitalized because of acute myocardial infarction has dropped by 44% in the last 15 years, from 11.3% to 6.4%. The SCAR registry compared data from 733 patients in 47 centres in Argentina that participated in both registries of 1996 and 2011. The analysis was made using identical criteria for the definition of myocardial infarction and coronary risk factors in both registries.

The registry also showed that there were 55% fewer smokers in 2011 compared to 1996. But over that 15 year period there was a 30% increase in patients with high cholesterol levels and a 53% increase in patients with background hypertension.

Dr Villarreal said: "In the last 15 years we have seen a dramatic decrease in smoking in patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction. This coincides with a moderate decrease in smoking habits in Argentina."

In 2011 a higher proportion of patients had previous infarction and coronary interventions (angioplasty and coronary bypass surgery). In 2011 there was also an increase in patients previously treated with aspirin, betablockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins.

The study also found a substantial reduction (59%) in mortality in the group of patients that were reperfused. Although there was no increase in the total number of patients who received reperfusion treatment, in eligible patients with ST segment elevation the rate of reperfusion increased from 65% to 85%. There was a higher use of primary or direct coronary angioplasty, aspirin, betablockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins.

Dr Villarreal said: "Results from the SCAR registry show that treatment for myocardial infarction in Argentina has improved over the past 15 years, with greater use of recommended treatments and medications. Clinicians should now focus their efforts on facilitating the access of patients with acute myocardial infarction to rapid reperfusion therapy and on extending the benefits of evidence based therapies to all patients."

Dr Jorge A.Belardi, President Elect 2013 of the Argentine Society of Cardiology and President of the Scientific Committee of the 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology, said: "The Argentine Society of Cardiology is committed to working to reduce cardiovascular mortality in our country. Our priorities will be primary prevention, working directly with the community, the government and the food industry. We will also focus on continuous medical education, with high adherence to medical guidelines, among other policies."

Prof Michel Komajda, Past-President of the ESC who is heading the European delegation said: "CVD is a global challenge. The ESC is proud to be working with its affiliate societies to spread key prevention messages. The ESC's Global Scientific Activities project aims to create a truly international cardiology community and to build on our history of successful cooperation with national societies beyond Europe."

The congress follows the launch of the Argentine Foundation of Cardiology campaign "El corazón de una mujer puede romperse EN SERIO" (A woman's heart can be broken SERIOUSLY). Women with heart disease seek medical help two hours later than men on average. The campaign aims to increase awareness of the problem of heart disease in women so that they receive earlier and better access to treatment and adopt heart healthy behaviours. Under the artistic direction of photographer Andy Cherniasvsky, the campaign will display photos and videos of local celebrities, plus a heart attack survivor, on public streets and television stations across Argentina.
-end-
References

(1) The congress marks the celebration of 75 years since the Argentine Society of Cardiology was founded. This year's scientific programme covers the latest advances in cardiology. The main topics include the new anticoagulant drugs in atrial fibrillation, acute coronary syndrome, interventional cardiology, imaging, heart failure, prevention, diabetes and the decision making process in clinical practice.

(2) The most important topics from the ESC Congress 2012 in Munich will be presented by experts from the ESC, including Past-President Professor Michel Komajda, during a one-day collaborative programme on 6 October. This will cover the most up-to-date science in heart failure, arrhythmias, interventional cardiology, valvular heart disease and prevention. Sessions will also be held on the latest ESC guidelines (heart failure, valvular heart disease, STEMI, prevention) and registries (pregnancy in cardiac diseases, heart failure, atrial fibrillation).

Notes to editor

For more information on the ESC at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology see here: http://www.escardio.org/congresses/global-activities/argentina/Pages/argentine-congress.aspx

For info on the Argentine Congress of Cardiology see here: http://www.sac.org.ar/web/es/congreso

Argentine prevention campaign: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6mK4Yogcl8

About the European Society of Cardiology: http://www.escardio.org/Pages/index.aspx

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 75,000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.

About the ESC Global Scientific Activities Committee: http://www.escardio.org/congresses/global-activities/Pages/ESC-GSA-Calendar.aspx

The ESC Global Scientific Activities (GSA) is a programme of international ESC educational courses, built around a global network of international partnerships.

About ESC Affiliated Cardiac Societies:http://www.escardio.org/membership/affiliated-societies/Pages/welcome.aspx

Affiliated Cardiac Societies are main professional bodies within cardiovascular medicine, based in regions outside Europe and the Mediterranean basin.

European Society of Cardiology

Related Heart Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure.

Mechanism linking gum disease to heart disease, other inflammatory conditions discovered
The link between periodontal (gum) disease and other inflammatory conditions such as heart disease and diabetes has long been established, but the mechanism behind that association has, until now, remained a mystery.

New 'atlas' of human heart cells first step toward precision treatments for heart disease
Scientists have for the first time documented all of the different cell types and genes expressed in the healthy human heart, in research published in the journal Nature.

With a heavy heart: How men and women develop heart disease differently
A new study by researchers from McGill University has uncovered that minerals causing aortic heart valve blockage in men and women are different, a discovery that could change how heart disease is diagnosed and treated.

Heart-healthy diets are naturally low in dietary cholesterol and can help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke
Eating a heart-healthy dietary pattern rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, vegetable oils and nuts, which is also limits salt, red and processed meats, refined-carbohydrates and added sugars, is relatively low in dietary cholesterol and supports healthy levels of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol.

Pacemakers can improve heart function in patients with chemotherapy-induced heart disease
Research has shown that treating chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy with commercially available cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) delivered through a surgically implanted defibrillator or pacemaker can significantly improve patient outcomes.

Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure raising risk of heart disease
Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart's main pumping chamber in young adults, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

New health calculator can help predict heart disease risk, estimate heart age
A new online health calculator can help people determine their risk of heart disease, as well as their heart age, accounting for sociodemographic factors such as ethnicity, sense of belonging and education, as well as health status and lifestyle behaviors.

Wide variation in rate of death between VA hospitals for patients with heart disease, heart failure
Death rates for veterans with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure varied widely across the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system from 2010 to 2014, which could suggest differences in the quality of cardiovascular health care provided by VA medical centers.

Heart failure: The Alzheimer's disease of the heart?
Similar to how protein clumps build up in the brain in people with some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, protein clumps appear to accumulate in the diseased hearts of mice and people with heart failure, according to a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers.

Read More: Heart Disease News and Heart Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.