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Meet a molecular architect: Hosea Nelson (video)

October 04, 2016

WASHINGTON, Sept. 15, 2016 -- Speaking of Chemistry visits the University of California at Los Angeles to meet with Hosea Nelson, Ph.D., who is tackling the challenge of total synthesis -- the use of chemistry to build any molecule. Learn about the importance of breakthroughs like Nelson's synthesis of potentially life-saving compounds and the research needed to make total synthesis more efficient. Check out this stop on the Speaking of Chemistry Road Trip here: https://youtu.be/tWp9RudUikM.
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