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The science behind PMS: What causes it and why (video)

October 04, 2016

WASHINGTON, Oct. 4, 2016 -- Premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, affects the majority of women to some degree. A grab bag of unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms, PMS can be much more than an annoyance. This week, Reactions looks at how hormones including estrogen and progesterone interact with secondary chemicals, which can lead to symptoms of PMS. Check out the video here: https://youtu.be/W5BvYvyfarw.

Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions to be the first to see our latest videos.
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