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The science of staleness: How to bring chips and bread back from the dead (video)

October 04, 2016

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, 2016 -- It's football season, which means it's time to get the game-day snacks ready. Don't let stale chips put a damper on football night. This week, Reactions covers the science of staling, including the role starches play and some chemistry-backed tips you can use to save stale bread and chips. Grab the dip, and then check it out here: https://youtu.be/W_n1uWBqjs8.

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