Nav: Home

The science of staleness: How to bring chips and bread back from the dead (video)

October 04, 2016

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, 2016 -- It's football season, which means it's time to get the game-day snacks ready. Don't let stale chips put a damper on football night. This week, Reactions covers the science of staling, including the role starches play and some chemistry-backed tips you can use to save stale bread and chips. Grab the dip, and then check it out here: https://youtu.be/W_n1uWBqjs8.

Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions to be the first to see our latest videos.
-end-
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 158,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related Check Articles:

Study shows reduced Illinois Medicaid spending in pediatric population, limited savings from care coordination
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are reporting in JAMA Network Open that Medicaid expenditures for children and young adults have decreased in Illinois.
Monthly phone check-in may mean less depression for families of patients with dementia
A monthly, 40-minute phone call from a non-clinical professional may suppress or reverse the trajectory of depression so frequently experienced by family members caring for patients with dementia at home, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
NHS 'health checks' reduce cardiovascular disease risk, new study finds
Attending a health check as part of the England National Health Services 'Health Check' program is associated with increased risk management interventions and decreased risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the six years following the check, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Samah Alageel of King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, and colleagues from King's College London, UK.
A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease
Engineers have shown it is technically possible to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take micro-ultrasound images.
How the immune system keeps the Epstein-Barr virus in check
A protein called PD-1, which is found on immune cells called CD8+ T cells, plays a key role in controlling infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, according to a study published May 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christian Münz of the University of Zurich, and colleagues.
Quantum cloud computing with self-check
With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics.
Coral reefs near equator less affected by ocean warming
Ocean warming is threatening coral reefs globally, with persistent thermal stress events degrading coral reefs worldwide, but a new study has found that corals at or near the equator are affected less than corals elsewhere.
Novel electrocardiogram uses signals from ear and hand to check heart rhythm
A novel electrocardiogram (ECG) method which uses signals from the ear and hand to check heart rhythm is revealed today at EHRA 20191 a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.
New weapon to combat counterfeit goods: use your smartphone to check for fake merchandise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have invented a chemical fingerprint that, when used with a phone app, reveals whether a product is genuine or a fake.
Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets
Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according to the first results of a new health check developed at the University of Tokyo.
More Check News and Check Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.