Nav: Home

PharmaMar and Boryung Pharm sign a licensing agreement for Aplidin® (plitidepsin) in Korea

October 04, 2016

PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) has announced today a licensing agreement with Boryung Pharm to commercialize the marine-derived anticancer drug Aplidin® (plitidepsin) in South Korea. Under the terms of the agreement, PharmaMar will receive an upfront payment along with royalties and additional remunerations upon achieving regulatory milestones with Aplidin®. PharmaMar will retain exclusive production rights and will supply the finished product to Boryung Pharm for commercial use.

Aplidin® is PharmaMar's second anticancer drug is currently under development for the treatment of multiple myeloma along with relapsed or refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The company announced in March 2016 that plitidepsin has shown positive results in a pivotal Phase III clinical trial (ADMYRE) for multiple myeloma.

"The partnership with Boryung Pharm will help in the commercialization in South Korea of plitidepsin, developed to tackle cancer. This will be our third licensing agreement in Asia", said Luis Mora, Managing Director of PharmaMar´s Oncology Business Unit. "We are looking forward to working with our partner in Korea and to advancing in the upcoming regulatory steps that will lead to future sales of Aplidin®", he added.

Boryung Pharm Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Tae-Hong Choi said, "we look forward to working with PharmaMar to ensure this valuable multiple myeloma therapy is available as soon as possible to patients in Korea." He added "despite remarkable advances in oncology over recent years, multiple myeloma has still remained an incurable illness. Therefore Aplidin® may be highly valuable as a new curable guideline for this difficult cancer".
-end-
About APLIDIN® (plitidepsin)

Plitidepsin is an investigational anticancer agent of marine origin, originally obtained from the ascidian Aplidium albicans. It specifically binds to the eEF1A2 and targets the non-canonical role of this protein, resulting in tumor cell death via apoptosis (programed death). Plitidepsin is currently in clinical development for hematological cancers, including a Phase Ib trial in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma as a triple combination of plitidepsin, bortezomib and dexamethasone, and a Phase II study in relapsed or refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. A Phase III trial in multiple myeloma relapsed or refractory has been completed. Plitidepsin has received orphan drug designation in the European Union and the United States of America.

About Boryung Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.,

Established in 1963, Boryung Pharmaceutical has been one of Korea`s leading pharmaceutical companies with sales revenue of KRW 400 billion, 1,155 employees and 550 sales representatives as of 2015. The company is fully integrated from R&D through manufacturing, marketing and sales with an established presence in Korea. The company has focused on the development and commercialization of new pharmaceutical products. Its main therapeutic categories are oncology, cardiovascular, anti-infective, respiratory and others. Especially Boryung is the strongest company in anti-cancer market in Korea. Additional information can be found at http://www.boryung.co.kr

About PharmaMar

Headquartered in Madrid, PharmaMar is a world-leading biopharmaceutical company in the discovery and development of innovative marine-derived anticancer drugs. The company has an important pipeline of drug candidates and a robust R&D oncology program. PharmaMar develops and commercializes YONDELIS® in Europe and has three other clinical-stage programs under development for several types of solid and hematological cancers, PM1183, plitidepsin, and PM184. PharmaMar is a global biopharmaceutical company with subsidiaries in Germany, Italy, France, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Belgium and the United States. PharmaMar fully owns other companies: GENOMICA, Spain's leading molecular diagnostics company; Sylentis, dedicated to researching therapeutic applications of gene silencing (RNAi); and two other chemical enterprises, Zelnova Zeltia and Xylazel. To learn more about PharmaMar, please visit us at http://www.pharmamar.com.

Pharmamar

Related Multiple Myeloma Articles:

CAR T-Cell therapy sends multiple myeloma into lasting remission
In an early clinical trial, 33 out of 35 (94 percent) patients had clinical remission of multiple myeloma upon receiving a new type of immunotherapy -- chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting B-cell maturation protein or BCMA.
Using a rabbit virus to treat multiple myeloma
Treating multiple myeloma (MM) with myxoma virus (MYXV) eliminated a majority of malignant cells in preclinical studies, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and elsewhere in an article published online on Dec.
Inhibition of EZH2 might be new therapy of multiple myeloma
In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease.
Additions to standard multiple myeloma therapy do not appear to yield additional benefit
Trial results being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego suggest two therapies that are often added to standard therapy in patients with multiple myeloma do not improve rates of progression-free survival compared with the current standard course of treatment alone.
Early treatment may prevent progression to multiple myeloma
Early intervention with an immunotherapy-based drug combination may prevent progression of high-risk 'smoldering' multiple myeloma to the full-blown disease, according to researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
Advances in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic malignancies presented at ASH
Researchers from UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented new findings in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic disorders at Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology.
Weight loss may help prevent multiple myeloma
Carrying extra weight increases a person's risk that a benign blood disorder will develop into multiple myeloma, a blood cancer.
Researchers take step toward understanding how multiple myeloma takes hold
Scientists are moving closer to understanding how multiple myeloma takes hold in bone marrow by identifying what they believe are the mechanisms used by cancer cells to take over.
Elotuzumab in multiple myeloma: Added benefit not proven
The only study presented was unsuitable for the benefit assessment.
As body mass index increases, so does spread of multiple myeloma
In a new study, American University researchers show how, as body mass index increases, so does the growth and spread of the blood cancer multiple myeloma.

Related Multiple Myeloma Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...