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Clocking in results on high-speed penetration

October 04, 2016

World Scientific has published a handbook on the experimental results of high-speed penetration.

In this unique compendium, "World Scientific Handbook of Experimental Results on High Speed Penetration into Metals, Concrete and Soils", Gabi Ben-Dor, Anatoly Dubinsky, and Tov Elperin collected experiments on high-velocity penetration into various types of shields where high-speed penetration is accompanied mainly by local interaction of a striker with a shield and corresponds approximately to the range of impact velocities from one hundred fifty up to one thousand and five hundred meters per second.

The authors also analyzed a certain number of experiments with relatively small impact velocities when a striker interacts with a whole plate and hypervelocity penetration when penetration proceeds under conditions of a hydrodynamic flow regime.

The main goal of this unique compendium is to systemize experimental data on basic integral parameters which characterize the initial and the final states of the striker and of the shield, without analyzing penetration process. It contains a vast systematized data of 14,000 experiments on high-velocity penetration into metals, concrete, reinforced concrete, and geological media which were published in the open literature (journal papers, reports, conference proceedings) during the last 70 years.

Data presented in this edition are related to the initial and final stages of penetration and include: parameters which characterize mechanical and geometric properties of the striker and the shield; striking and residual velocities of projectile or depth of penetration; changes of mass and size of projectile; angles that determine the initial and residual position of the projectile; ballistic limit velocity; basic characteristics of plug and deformation of the shield.

Unified form of data representation and common notations are used throughout the book. All information is presented in numerical form in SI units. The book also contains indices which allow a fast search of the authors' publications and related experiments.

This 624-page "World Scientific Handbook of Experimental Results on High Speed Penetration into Metals, Concrete and Soils" compendium retails at US$198 / £164 (hardcover) in major bookstores. More information can be found at http://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/10026?utm_source=eureka_alert&utm_medium=press_release&utm_campaign=eureka_10190.
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About World Scientific Publishing Co.:

World Scientific Publishing is a leading independent publisher of books and journals for the scholarly, research, professional and educational communities. The company publishes about 600 books annually and about 130 journals in various fields. World Scientific collaborates with prestigious organizations like the Nobel Foundation, US National Academies Press, as well as its subsidiary, the Imperial College Press, amongst others, to bring high quality academic and professional content to researchers and academics worldwide. To find out more about World Scientific, please visit http://www.worldscientific.com. For more information, contact Jason at cjlim@wspc.com

World Scientific

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