Women are less likely to receive lung protective tidal volumes when being considered as a lung donor

October 04, 2018

A study presented at the CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 in San Antonio examined the adherence to lung protective ventilation and whether there were sex specific differences in mechanical ventilation strategies. The authors found that potential organ donors frequently did not receive appropriate low tidal volumes (VT) in the transplant evaluation period.

More than half (65 percent) of all patients received excessive VT during the 48 hours prior to death. In addition, 40 percent of the time patients received excessively high volumes. Women were more likely to receive excessively high tidal volumes than men (76 percent of women vs 57 percent of men; P<.001). Women also spent more time receiving excessive VT (46 percent of the time vs 32 percent of the time for men) and were more likely to receive TVs greater than 10mL/kg.

The association between female sex and excessive VT remained significant after multiple regression analysis adjusting for height, BMI, trauma death and donation outcomes. Other independent predictors of excessive TVs were morbid obesity, shorter height and trauma as a cause of death.

"While this is a single-center retrospective review, it suggests the possibility of an important disparity," states lead researcher Dr. Joaquin A. Chapa. "Multicenter studies are needed to determine the impact of excessive tidal volumes on organ suitability and outcomes."
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Further results from these two studies will be shared at CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 in San Antonio on Monday, Oct. 8, 3:15 PM to 4:15 PM, at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Centre, Room 214B. The study abstracts can be viewed on the journal CHEST® website.

ABOUT CHEST 2018

CHEST 2018 is the 84th annual meeting for the American College of Chest Physicians held Oct. 6 to Oct. 10, 2018, in San Antonio, Texas. The American College of Chest Physicians, publisher of the journal CHEST®, is the global leader in advancing best patient outcomes through innovative chest medicine education, clinical research and team-based care. Its mission is to champion the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chest diseases through education, communication and research. It serves as an essential connection to clinical knowledge and resources for its 19,000 members from around the world who provide patient care in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. For more information about CHEST 2018, visit chestmeeting.chestnet.org, or follow CHEST meeting hashtag, #CHEST2018, on social media.

American College of Chest Physicians

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