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This Week from AGU Oct. 5, 2016

October 05, 2016

GeoSpace

Research suggests Saturn's moon Dione may harbor a subsurface ocean


A subsurface ocean could lie deep within Saturn's moon Dione, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, which used publicly available data from the Cassini mission to Saturn.

Research Spotlights

Switching to drought-tolerant plants could alter urban climates


Replacing Los Angeles's lawns with native plants that need less water could lead to hotter days and cooler nights, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters.

Mars's climate may have been wet much later than thought

New research published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets suggests Mars's water-carved valleys may be relatively young, challenging assumptions about the history of the Red Planet's climate.

Earthquakes could funnel radio waves to dark zones in mountains

By being coupled with a layer of mobile electrical charges on the Earth's surface, radio waves could travel over the ground to areas that would normally be unreachable, like behind a mountain, according to a new study in Radio Science.

Tide gauge records may underestimate 20th century sea level rise

New research published in Geophysical Research Letters suggests the best tide gauge records tend to underestimate the average rate of 20th century global sea level rise.

Mapping water and heat deep under Long Valley Caldera

In a new study from Geophysical Research Letters, researchers use electrical resistivity to find the heat source and reservoir feeding Long Valley Caldera's labyrinthine hydrothermal system.
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