Nav: Home

Preparing for (another) biological attack

October 07, 2016

This news release was issued on 28-Sept-2016

In the weeks following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, five people died from exposure to anthrax-laced letters, and several more were infected. Fifteen years on, the U.S. has spent billions of dollars to fortify the nation's biodefenses against future attacks, but is it enough? The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, examines whether the U.S. is really ready for another Amerithrax.

Matt Davenport, an associate editor at C&EN, reports that after the 2001 anthrax attacks, first responders had unprecedented opportunities to apply for federal grants to purchase biodefense equipment. Manufacturers obliged by supplying a wide range of instruments with a variety of capabilities. And researchers are continuing to improve detection technology and develop therapeutics to counter potential attacks in the future.

But how would all the pieces fit together in a real-life crisis? The FBI, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, first responders and law enforcement have put protocols in place to deal with future biological threats. However, field testing, training, technological capabilities and communications networks vary across jurisdictions. This inconsistency could hobble any future response to a biological attack. To get everyone on the same page, experts are calling for federal standards to ensure that the handling of such emergencies would be rapid and seamless.
-end-
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related American Chemical Society Articles:

American Chemical Society announces ACS Energy Letters
Researchers working on clean-energy technologies can now rapidly share their findings with the global scientific community in ACS Energy Letters, a new peer-reviewed journal from the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
Plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting will focus on innovation
Scientists will offer an inside look at moving new drugs, foods and materials from the lab to the marketplace in three plenary talks at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, taking place Aug.
Highlights for 2015 national meeting of American Chemical Society
Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 250th National Meeting & Exposition this fall will have a wealth of new scientific information available for their news stories.
PNNL team wins American Chemical Society award
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory wins the first-ever team award for the American Chemical Society's Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science.
American Chemical Society members win National Medals
Four eminent American Chemical Society members are among a new class of 11 recipients of the National Medal of Science and the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.
American Chemical Society to honor UT Arlington chemist
University of Texas at Arlington professor Daniel W. Armstrong has more than 550 scientific works to his credit and technology he invented is on its way to a rendezvous with a comet.
American Chemical Society launches Sustainable Food toolkit
As the world's population swells beyond 10 billion people later this century, what can we do to sustain the farmland, energy and water supplies needed to keep everyone fed?
5 tips for a better Thanksgiving: A new video by the American Chemical Society
Whether you're brining your bird this Thanksgiving or experimenting with
The Chemistry of Fear: A new video from the American Chemical Society
With Halloween just a few days away, millions are flocking to horror films and haunted houses for their annual dose of terror.
American Chemical Society podcast: A one-two punch against cancer
The latest episode in the American Chemical Society's award-winning Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions podcast series describes the development and successful lab tests on the first potential drug to pack a lethal one-two punch against melanoma skin cancer cells.

Related American Chemical Society Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".