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Emerging Sciences and a Changing World: EU-Japan in Transition

October 07, 2016

We are pleased to inform you of the symposium "Emerging Sciences and a Changing World: EU-Japan in Transition" to be held on 8 November 2016 at Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). This is the 7th Kobe University Brussels European Centre and this year's symposium is jointly organised with VUB. During the event, the latest collaborations between Japan and EU in Data Science, Cultural Diversity, Migration and Security, and Particle Physics will be introduced by prominent researchers from Japanese and EU institutions.

Event programme:http://www.office.kobe-u.ac.jp/ipiep/materials/programme20161108_en.pdf

Registration:http://www.office.kobe-u.ac.jp/ipiep/ceus/registration_euen/registration.html

For enquiries, please contact the Kobe University Centre for EU Academic Collaboration at: intl-relations(a)office.kobe-u.ac.jp

Date: Tuesday 8 Nov 2016 9:30 - 18:00

Venue: Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Generaal Jacqueslaan 271, 1050 Brussels, Belgium)

Programme:

Session I 10:00-13:30
Data science in the Age of Big Data

Session II 10:00-13:30
European Values - Unity in Diversity

Session III 14:30 - 18:00
Migration and Security

Session IV 14:30 - 18:00
Beyond Standard Model at LHC and Neutrino experiments
-end-


Kobe University

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