Revolutionary HIV drug Fuzeon wins most prestigious award for innovation

October 08, 2004

Revolutionary HIV drug Fuzeon wins most prestigious award for innovationToday, HIV drug Fuzeon (enfuvirtide or T-20) was awarded the 2004 International Prix Galien for the most innovative new medicine. Fuzeon was selected out of 12 major new drugs in all therapeutic areas which each won national awards. Since 1970 Roche has won a total of 24 international and national Prix Galien medals, notably winning the international award twice in the field of HIV. This reflects Roche's strong track record in innovation across its entire product portfolio.

"Fuzeon was considered as the clear winner by the whole jury because it represents a new therapeutic approach, in fact the only new class of antiretroviral HIV drugs to emerge in the last eight years. Fuzeon markedly contributes to a significant increase in patients' quality of life", said Professor Walter Osswald, the President of the International Prix Galien Jury.

"This distinguished award is another testimony to Roche's unique innovation capabilities enhancing the development of truly novel medicines; this also brings great pride and motivation to everyone at Roche", said William M. Burns, Head of Roche's Pharmaceuticals Division. "However, innovation is only one milestone of Fuzeon's success; the next crucial step is getting the drug to those who need it."

Fuzeon - bringing the medicine to patients

Despite this acknowledgement of the drug as a huge technological advance, Roche's latest research showed that as many as 4 out of 5 eligible patients are missing the opportunity to benefit from this breakthrough. To ensure all eligible patients who need Fuzeon can benefit from the drug Roche is currently working with physicians, patient organisations and government agencies. Education programmes are leading to improved access. Within just three months, Fuzeon patients are twice as likely to achieve undetectable levels of virus in their blood compared to those who are not taking Fuzeon1. Roche has recently launched comprehensive nurse-to-patient and patient-to-patient support initiatives to help coach patients through the first three critical months of therapy by which time dramatic benefits of Fuzeon can be seen and self-injection becomes routine.

"The immediacy and magnitude of Fuzeon's benefits is a strong incentive for pre-treated patients to embrace Fuzeon as a core part of their next HIV treatment cocktail and, furthermore, data now show that these benefits can be maintained for two years," commented Dr Anton Pozniak, Consultant Physician, Department of HIV and Genitourinary, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, UK.

International Prix Galien Award

The International Prix Galien award recognises significant advances in pharmaceutical research. Each year, the award is an opportunity to recognise the most important drugs introduced into the public market and the most significant research team in the pharmaceutical field. The Galien award has grown into a huge event and is now considered as the industry's equivalent of the Nobel prize and the highest accolade for pharmaceutical research and development.

Winning three International Prix Galien medals (1992 Neupogen; 1998 Invirase; 2004 Fuzeon) Roche has won the most international awards of any company. To date in 2004 Fuzeon has won a total of four national Prix Galien medals in Portugal, Netherlands, Belgium and UK. Other nationally awarded Roche medicines include Herceptin against breast cancer (2002) and the antiparkinson agent Madopar (1974).
-end-
About Roche Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Roche is one of the world's leading innovation-driven healthcare groups. Its core businesses are pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. As a supplier of products and services for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, the Group contributes on a broad range of fronts to improving people's health and quality of life. Roche is number one in the global diagnostics market, the leading supplier of pharmaceuticals for cancer and transplantation and a market leader in virology. In 2003 prescription drug sales by the Pharmaceuticals Division totalled 19.8 billion Swiss francs, while the Diagnostics Division posted sales of 7.4 billion Swiss francs. Roche employs roughly 65,000 people in 150 countries and has alliances and R&D agreements with numerous partners, including majority ownership interests in Genentech and Chugai.

All trademarks used or mentioned in this release are legally protected.

References:
1 Arasteh et al. XV IAC Bangkok, Thailand, 2004. Abstract MoOrB1058XX For further information:
www.roche-hiv.com
www.roche.com/home/sustain/sus_med.htm

Ketchum UK

Related HIV Articles from Brightsurf:

BEAT-HIV Delaney collaboratory issues recommendations measuring persistent HIV reservoirs
Spearheaded by Wistar scientists, top worldwide HIV researchers from the BEAT-HIV Martin Delaney Collaboratory to Cure HIV-1 Infection by Combination Immunotherapy (BEAT-HIV Collaboratory) compiled the first comprehensive set of recommendations on how to best measure the size of persistent HIV reservoirs during cure-directed clinical studies.

The Lancet HIV: Study suggests a second patient has been cured of HIV
A study of the second HIV patient to undergo successful stem cell transplantation from donors with a HIV-resistant gene, finds that there was no active viral infection in the patient's blood 30 months after they stopped anti-retroviral therapy, according to a case report published in The Lancet HIV journal and presented at CROI (Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections).

Children with HIV score below HIV-negative peers in cognitive, motor function tests
Children who acquired HIV in utero or during birth or breastfeeding did not perform as well as their peers who do not have HIV on tests measuring cognitive ability, motor function and attention, according to a report published online today in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Efforts to end the HIV epidemic must not ignore people already living with HIV
Efforts to prevent new HIV transmissions in the US must be accompanied by addressing HIV-associated comorbidities to improve the health of people already living with HIV, NIH experts assert in the third of a series of JAMA commentaries.

The Lancet HIV: Severe anti-LGBT legislations associated with lower testing and awareness of HIV in African countries
This first systematic review to investigate HIV testing, treatment and viral suppression in men who have sex with men in Africa finds that among the most recent studies (conducted after 2011) only half of men have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months.

The Lancet HIV: Tenfold increase in number of adolescents on HIV treatment in South Africa since 2010, but many still untreated
A new study of more than 700,000 one to 19-year olds being treated for HIV infection suggests a ten-fold increase in the number of adolescents aged 15 to 19 receiving HIV treatment in South Africa, according to results published in The Lancet HIV journal.

Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease.

NIH HIV experts prioritize research to achieve sustained ART-free HIV remission
Achieving sustained remission of HIV without life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a top HIV research priority, according to a new commentary in JAMA by experts at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

The Lancet HIV: PrEP implementation is associated with a rapid decline in new HIV infections
Study from Australia is the first to evaluate a population-level roll-out of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in men who have sex with men.

Researchers date 'hibernating' HIV strains, advancing BC's leadership in HIV cure research
Researchers have developed a novel way for dating 'hibernating' HIV strains, in an advancement for HIV cure research.

Read More: HIV News and HIV Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.