Air pollution linked to hair loss, new research reveals

October 08, 2019

(MADRID, 9 October, 2019) Research presented today at the 28th EADV Congress in Madrid shows, for the first time, that exposure to common air pollutants known as particulate matter (PM) is linked to hair loss in humans.

The research was conducted by exposing cells from the human scalp at the base of hair follicles, known as human follicle dermal papilla cells (HFDPCs), to various concentrations of PM10-like dust and diesel particulate. After 24 hours the researchers performed a scientific process, known as western blotting, to detect the levels of specific proteins in the cells. The results showed that the presence of PM10 and diesel particulate decreased levels of β-catenin, the protein responsible for hair growth and morphogenesis.

The study also revealed that the levels of three other proteins (cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK2), which are responsible for hair growth and hair retention, were decreased by PM10-like dust and diesel particulate in a dose dependent manner, meaning that the greater the level of pollutant, the greater the decrease in proteins was found.

Particulate matter (PM) is the term used to describe a mixture of solid particles and droplets found in the air. PM is divided into two categories; PM10 which are particles with a diameter of 10 micrometres or smaller and PM2.5 which have a diameter of 2.5 micrometres or smaller. Both PM10 and PM2.5 are considered to be major pollutants and are linked to various serious health conditions, such as heart and lung disease, cancer and respiratory problems. In total, ambient air pollution is estimated to kill 4.2 million people every year but the effects on the skin and hair are not well known.

Sources of PM include the burning of fossil fuels, including petrol, diesel and other solid-fuels such as coal, oil and biomass as well as other industrial activities such as building, mining and the manufacturing of building materials like cement, ceramics and bricks.

Lead researcher, Hyuk Chul Kwon from the Future Science Research Centre in the Republic of Korea, comments; "While the link between air pollution and serious diseases such as cancer, COPD and CVD are well established there is little to no research on the effect of particular matter exposure on the human skin and hair in particular. Our research explains the mode of action of air pollutants on human follicle dermal papilla cells, showing how the most common air pollutants lead to hair loss".
-end-
Notes to Editors

A reference to the 28th EADV Congress must be included when communicating any information within this press release.

Contact:

For further information or to arrange an expert interview, please contact either:

Phoebe Deans - EADV Press Officer
phoebe@spinkhealth.com
+44 (0) 7732 499170
+44 (0) 1444 811099

Jamie Wilkes - EADV Press Officer
jamie@spinkhealth.com
+44 (0) 7732 499170
+44 (0) 1444 811099

About the Future Science Research Centre:

The Future Science Research Centre is based at Coreana Cosmetic, Republic of Korea. Coreana Cosmetic is known as one of the top-class cosmetics companies producing and distributing Korean cosmetics for 30 years since 1988. Songpa R&D center, which is the pride of Coreana Cosmetics, is leading Korean cosmetics industry with high technologies and securing them by having patents.

About EADV:

Founded in 1987, EADV is a non-profit organisation whose vision is to be the premier European Dermato-Venereology Society, with the key aims of improving the quality of patient care, providing continuing medical education (CME) for all Dermato-Venereologists in Europe, and advocacy on behalf of the specialty and patients.

Find out more via the EADV website: https://www.eadv.org/

References:

1. Effects of particular matter on human dermal papilla (Hyuk Chul Kwon). Presented at the 28th EADV Congress, Madrid, 9 October, 2019

2. United States Environmental Protection Agency. Particulate Matter (PM) Pollution. Available at: https://www.epa.gov/pm-pollution/particulate-matter-pm-basics

3. Air pollution. World Health Organisation. Available at: https://www.who.int/airpollution/en/

4. Ambient air pollution: Pollutants. World Health Organisation. Available at: https://www.who.int/airpollution/ambient/pollutants/en/

Spink Health

Related Air Pollution Articles from Brightsurf:

How air pollution affects homeless populations
When air quality worsens, either from the smoke and ozone of summer or the inversion of winter, most of us stay indoors.

Exploring the neurological impact of air pollution
Air pollution has become a fact of modern life, with a majority of the global population facing chronic exposure.

Spotting air pollution with satellites, better than ever before
Researchers from Duke University have devised a method for estimating the air quality over a small patch of land using nothing but satellite imagery and weather conditions.

Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy is associated with growth delays
A new study by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has found an association between exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and delays in physical growth in the early years after birth.

Nearly half of US breathing unhealthy air; record-breaking air pollution in nine cities
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of air pollution on lung health is of heightened concern.

Air pollution linked to dementia and cardiovascular disease
People continuously exposed to air pollution are at increased risk of dementia, especially if they also suffer from cardiovascular diseases, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAMA Neurology.

New framework will help decide which trees are best in the fight against air pollution
A study from the University of Surrey has provided a comprehensive guide on which tree species are best for combating air pollution that originates from our roads -- along with suggestions for how to plant these green barriers to get the best results.

Air pollution is one of the world's most dangerous health risks
Researchers calculate that the effects of air pollution shorten the lives of people around the world by an average of almost three years.

The world faces an air pollution 'pandemic'
Air pollution is responsible for shortening people's lives worldwide on a scale far greater than wars and other forms of violence, parasitic and insect-born diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS and smoking, according to a study published in Cardiovascular Research.

Air pollution in childhood linked to schizophrenia
Children who grow up in areas with heavy air pollution have a higher risk of developing schizophrenia.

Read More: Air Pollution News and Air Pollution Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.