Environmental toxicology experts to convene at Penn symposium

October 09, 2006

WHAT: Members of the media are invited to attend The Environment, Health and Disease, a symposium hosted by the new Center for Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET) at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. The Center is the first of its kind in Pennsylvania and will bring together world-renowned experts from the field of environmental toxicology. Topics to be addressed include lung and airway disease, endocrine and reproduction disruption, oxidative stress injury, genes and the environment, and biomarkers. The symposium will also focus on: collaborative research; translational research; grants and initiatives; training health care professionals; and community-based advocacy.

Several Penn scientists will be presenting new and updated research. This updated information will include recent discoveries in the area of asthma treatment, biomarkers for mesiothelioma (the "silent killer"), melanoma susceptibility genes, and gene-environment interactions and preterm birth. Scientists will discuss new initiatives to identify lung cancer susceptibility genes and the link between ozone and asthma. The symposium will also provide a forum in which scientists and stakeholders can discuss how to tackle environmental health issues that pervade our urban region.

The Center represents a partnership between research scientists and communities in southeastern Pennsylvania. Its mission is to understand the mechanism by which environmental exposures lead to disease. Understanding these processes can lead to early diagnosis, intervention, and prevention strategies. The goal of the center will be to improve environmental health and medicine in the region.

WHEN: Tuesday, October 17 7:30 am - 5:30 pm

WHERE: University of Pennsylvania's Biomedical Research Building II/III: Auditorium, 421 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA

Timeline:

7:30 am Continental Breakfast

8:00 Welcome-Dean, School of Medicine

8:15 CEET and its Mission: Dr. Trevor Penning

8:30 Lung and Airway Disease: Tackling Asthma

9:00 Endocrine and Reproduction Disruption: Role of Endocrine Disruptors on Male Reproductive Tract Development

9:30 Oxidative Stress and Stress Injury: Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cellular Toxicity

10:00 Genes and the Environment: Susceptibility to Melanoma

10:30 Break

11:00 Toxicogenomics: Gene-environment interactions and preterm birth

11:20 Toxicoproteomics: Assembling a sperm tail

11:40 Biomarkers: Mesothelin as a marker for mesiothelioma

12:00 Lunch

1:30 Collaborative Research with Environmental Health Science Centers

2:00 Translational Research and Environmental Medicine

2:30 Grants and Initiatives in Environmental Health Sciences

3:00 Break

3:30 Building Ties with Institute of Translational Medicine and Therapeutics

4:00 Integrative Health Facility Core

4:30 Training Health Care Professionals

5:00 Community Based Participation in CEET

5:30 Reception

NOTE: Registration is required to attend.

MORE INFO ON SYMPOSIUM: Nationally recognized speakers to include: Dr. William Martin, Associate Director for Translational Biomedical Research, who will speak on "Translational Research and Environmental Medicine" and Dr. Anne Sassaman, Director of Extramural Research and Training at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences who will discuss "Grants and Initiatives in Environmental Health Sciences."
-end-
EDITOR'S NOTES:

If you plan on attending this event, contact Mary Webster: 215-746-3031, or email at Webster@mail.med.upenn.edu or Rick Cushman: 215-349-5659 or email at Rick.Cushman@uphs.upenn.edu

Penn's School of Medicine is ranked #2 in the nation for receipt of NIH research funds; and ranked #3 in the nation in U.S. News & World Report's most recent ranking of top research-oriented medical schools. Supporting 1,400 fulltime faculty and 700 students, the School of Medicine is recognized worldwide for its superior education and training of the next generation of physician-scientists and leaders of academic medicine.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

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