SIM and Professor Luftman release 2007 CIO Survey data

October 09, 2007

HOBOKEN, N.J. ¯ The IT job market hasn't been so robust since the late 1990s, but explosive success is breeding serious shortages in high-quality IT talent, with potential negative consequences for continued growth, according to a major new survey of chief information officers conducted by Stevens Institute of Technology's Distinguished Professor Jerry Luftman, in association with the Society of Information Management.

Luftman, who is also Associate Dean of Graduate Information Systems Programs at Stevens, today released the results and ramifications of the SIM 2007 Survey of Chief Information Officers, conducted this summer.

The survey of IT executives from 112 companies across a range of industries was sponsored by the Society for Information Management (SIM) and administered and interpreted by Professor Luftman. The results were released today at a SIMposium conference in Memphis, Tenn.

The 2007 SIM survey report elaborates on the following findings and insights:
-end-
To interview Professor Luftman and receive a copy of the report on the survey of information executives, please contact Patrick A. Berzinski at +1-201-216-5687 or pberzins@stevens.edu

About Stevens Institute of Technology

Founded in 1870, Stevens Institute of Technology is one of the leading technological universities in the world dedicated to learning and research. Through its broad-based curricula, nurturing of creative inventiveness, and cross disciplinary research, the Institute is at the forefront of global challenges in engineering, science, and technology management. Partnerships and collaboration between, and among, business, industry, government and other universities contribute to the enriched environment of the Institute. A new model for technology commercialization in academe, known as Technogenesis®, involves external partners in launching business enterprises to create broad opportunities and shared value. Stevens offers baccalaureates, master's and doctoral degrees in engineering, science, computer science and management, in addition to a baccalaureate degree in the humanities and liberal arts, and in business and technology. The university has a total enrollment of 1,850 undergraduate and 2,980 graduate students, and a worldwide online enrollment of 2,250, with a full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty of 140 and more than 200 full-time special faculty. Stevens' graduate programs have attracted international participation from China, India, Southeast Asia, Europe and Latin America. Additional information may be obtained from its web page at www.stevens.edu. For the latest news about Stevens, please visit www.StevensNewsService.com.

Stevens Institute of Technology

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