US, European cancer educators gather in Alabama for meeting

October 09, 2007

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - To celebrate its 60th anniversary, the American Association for Cancer Education (AACE) will focus its annual meeting on health disparities and minority cancer education.

AACE's 2007 Annual Meeting is Oct. 11-13 at the Sheraton Birmingham Hotel, 2101 Richard Arrington Jr. Boulevard North. The conference is subtitled "Cancer Education in Minority and Underserved Populations."

The AACE meeting will draw 200 experts from the world's major universities and health institutions, including cancer researchers, doctors and educators from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) schools of Public Health, Medicine and the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Some attendees are expected to come from AACE's sister organization, the European Association for Cancer Education.

"It really made sense to bring the conference to the Southeast since an important area of focus is minority health, cancer disparities and cancer education in underserved communities," said AACE President-Elect John W. Waterbor, M.D., Dr.P.H., an associate professor in the UAB School of Public Health.

"Our university has a long-standing connection with AACE and its goals. Many UAB faculty and alumni share this commitment to enhancing cancer knowledge within the framework of medical schools, schools of public health and outreach," Waterbor said.

Sessions will include discussions of the use of community partnerships to implement clinical trials, especially trials that boost enrollment for cancer studies aimed at reducing health disparities. Other sessions will focus on the cancer education needs of African American and Hispanic patients, and how the faculties of schools of medicine, health professions, education, nursing, social work, dentistry, osteopathy and other disciplines can better coordinate cancer education programs.

Study findings and practice guidelines to be reported at the annual meeting include: Sharing ideas about health disparities and minority cancer education is crucial to reducing unequal burdens in prevention and medical care, said C. Michael Brooks, Ed.D., a professor in UAB's School of Health Professions and the local arrangements for AACE's 2007 annual meeting.

For instance, data show that many racial and ethnic minorities and medically underserved groups are more likely to develop cancer and die from the disease than the general U.S. population. Research also shows that uninsured patients are more likely to be diagnosed and treated for cancer at late stages of disease, and that they're more likely to receive less-than-optimal care.

"More than anything else these disparate numbers are issues that cancer educators and health care leaders nationwide must confront, and hopefully reverse," Brooks said.

In addition to workshops, symposia, poster sessions and podium presentations, the conference will include a ceremony to announce 2007 Margaret Hay Edwards Achievement Medal recipient. The award was established in 1986 to honor an individual who has made outstanding national or international contributions to cancer education.

AACE conferees will also be encouraged to participate in the 2007 Komen Race for the Cure 5K run and fitness walk on Saturday morning at Birmingham's Linn Park.
-end-
AACE was founded in 1947 as the Cancer Coordinators, an association of cancer educators from medical and dental schools that met annually to discuss topics and practices of mutual interest. The group reorganized under its present name, the AACE, in 1966 with the core mission of promoting cancer education and giving its members opportunities to advance their programs for cancer prevention, early detection, therapy and rehabilitation.

The association publishes the Journal of Cancer Education and maintains www.aaceonline.com, where the agenda for the 2007 annual meeting, and other information is found.

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Related Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

Read More: Cancer News and Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.