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Are natural alternatives to estrogen replacement therapy safe?

October 09, 2016

Although individuals often consume natural products because of their potential health benefits, a new review indicates that it is not clear whether the benefits of plant-derived compounds that mimic estrogen outweigh the possible health risks. The findings are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology.

Phytoestrogens are compounds from plants that are similar in structure to estrogen and are found in a variety of foods, especially soy. Some women may consume phytoestrogens promoted as natural alternatives to hormone replacement therapy to help ease menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes or to protect against bone loss.

When Ivonne Rietjens, PhD, of Wageningen University in The Netherlands, and her colleagues analyzed the published medical literature, they found that several potential health benefits of phytoestrogens have been reported, including lowered risks of cardiovascular disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, brain function disorders, and various types of cancer, in addition to reduced menopausal symptoms. Phytoestrogens are considered endocrine disruptors, however, which indicates that they have the potential to cause negative health effects, including infertility and increased risks of cancer in estrogen-sensitive organs such as the breast and uterus.

Given the data on potential negative health effects, the review's authors conclude that the current evidence on phytoestrogens' beneficial effects is not so obvious that they clearly outweigh the possible health risks. "This implies that a definite conclusion on the health effects of phytoestrogens, positive or negative, cannot be made," said Prof. Rietjens. It may be that the question of whether phytoestrogens are beneficial or harmful has different answers dependent on individuals' age, health status, and even the presence or absence of specific gut bacteria. Additional studies are needed to provide clarity.
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For more information or to obtain a PDF of any study, please contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

Full citation:"The potential health effects of dietary phytoestrogens." Ivonne M.C.M. Rietjens, Jochem Louisse, Karsten Beekmann. British Journal of Pharmacology; Published Online: October 10, 2016 (DOI: 10.1111/bph.13622).

URL Upon Publication:http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bph.13622

Author Contact:https://www.wur.nl/en/Newsroom.htm

About the Journal

The British Journal of Pharmacology is a broad-based journal giving leading international coverage of all aspects of pharmacology research. Its scope includes all aspects of pharmacology from hypothesis generation and target validation through to model development, safety pharmacology and to early translational research. BJP's 2015 Impact Factor is 5.259, and as such it is a leading general research pharmacology journal (Thomson Reuters Science Citation Index).

About The British Pharmacological Society

The British Pharmacological Society is a charity with a mission to promote and advance the whole spectrum of pharmacology. Founded in 1931, it is now a global community at the heart of pharmacology, with over 3,500 members from more than 60 countries worldwide. The Society leads the way in the research and application of pharmacology around the world through its scientific meetings, educational resources and peer-reviewed journals: the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Pharmacology Research & Perspectives, and the British Journal of Pharmacology, which includes the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, featuring open access overviews of the key properties of over 1,700 human therapeutic targets and their drugs, and links to http://www.guidetopharmacology.org.

Press Office: +44 20 7239 0180 | M. +44 7786 552498 | E. sophia.griffiths@bps.ac.uk

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Wiley, a global company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders.

The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

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