IOM workshop on less confusing drug labeling, Oct. 12

October 10, 2007

More than 90 million Americans have difficulty understanding and acting on health information, according to a 2004 health literacy report from the Institute of Medicine. Misinterpreting instructions printed on drug container labels and related literature can result in serious injury or even death. For example, researchers have found that the common dosage instruction, "take twice daily," has been interpreted in multiple ways by patients. IOM will hold a workshop to explore ways to make drug labels clearer and to better communicate usage information to patients.

DETAILS
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Room 100, National Academies' Keck Center, 500 Fifth St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Topics include:
-end-
An agenda is available at http://www.iom.edu/CMS/3793/31487/43961.aspx. Reporters: To register, contact the National Academies' Office of News and Public Information, tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail: news@nas.edu.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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