The American Society of Human Genetics hosts 58th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia

October 10, 2008

BETHESDA, MD - October 7, 2008 - The world's top scientists and clinicians in the human genetics field will gather in Philadelphia to present their latest research findings at the 58th Annual Meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) from Tuesday, November 11, through Saturday, November 15, 2008, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Founded in 1948, ASHG is the primary professional membership organization for human genetics specialists worldwide, representing nearly 8,000 researchers, academicians, clinicians, genetic counselors, nurses and others with a special interest in this area. The Society's Annual Meeting is the world's largest gathering of human genetics professionals and a forum for renowned experts in the field.

With more than 286 platform and plenary presentations, 2,329 posters, 26 invited sessions and special symposia, and four press briefing events (two of which will be webcast live to the media), the 2008 ASHG Annual Meeting will provide journalists with a rich resource of new information about cutting-edge developments in human genetics and genomics research. In addition, nearly 250 U.S. and international exhibitors will offer an unprecedented opportunity to view the latest advances in genetics-related products and services derived, in part, from work presented at previous ASHG meetings.

PRESS BRIEFING SESSIONS


ASHG has planned four press briefing events that will be held in the Pennsylvania Convention Center during the week of the Society's 58th Annual Meeting. For the first time, the Society will be webcasting two of this year's press briefing sessions live, allowing credentialed members of the media who are unable to attend the ASHG 2008 meeting to view the sessions in real time by linking to live online webcasts.

If you cannot attend this year's Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, but still wish to receive embargoed press releases from ASHG and/or register to view the live webcast(s) of either of the Society's two press briefing events scheduled for Thursday, November 13, 2008 (see details below), please e-mail your request to Kristen Long at klong@ashg.org, and remember to include your contact information.

The press briefing sessions at the ASHG 2008 meeting will feature presentations from prominent experts in the field on a diverse range of "hot" topics and issues in human genetics, including the following:

Wednesday, November 12, 2008:


Thursday, November 13, 2008: (WEBCAST SESSIONS)


Friday, November 14, 2008:


OTHER ASHG 2008 MEETING HIGHLIGHTS
To view a complete listing (and the full-text abstracts) of all scientific sessions and posters presented at the 2008 meeting, visit: http://www.ashg.org/2008meeting/pages/sessionlisting.shtml/.

GENERAL PRESS INFORMATION AND ONLINE REGISTRATION


The ASHG 2008 Annual Meeting is open to print, online and broadcast news media, all health, medical and science reporters, and freelance writers on a verifiable assignment from an established news source.

Complimentary meeting registration will be available to members of the media who provide appropriate press credentials and identification. The Society offers reporters many resources onsite at the meeting, including news releases, press conferences, media interviews with top experts in the field, and a press room with free Internet access and complimentary refreshments.

Press attendees are strongly encouraged to pre-register online for the 2008 meeting in advance, however, we will continue to offer onsite press registration in the ASHG Press Office as well (located on the third floor of the Pennsylvania Convention Center, in Room 304).* To pre-register for the ASHG 2008 meeting, please complete the online press registration application form located at the following URL: http://www.ashg.org/2008meeting/pages/press_register.shtml/.

For more information about ASHG's press guidelines, policies, and online press registration for the 2008 Annual Meeting, as well as details about this year's press briefing sessions, webcasts, speakers and experts available for interview, and other special media events and opportunities at the meeting, please visit: http://www.ashg.org/2008meeting/pages/press.shtml/. For general information on the 58th Annual Meeting, please visit http://www.ashg.org/2008meeting/.

Please direct all media inquiries to: Kristen Long, ASHG Communications Manager, via e-mail at klong@ashg.org, or by phone at 301-634-7346 (o) or at 240-281-2386 (c). For all onsite media inquiries during the ASHG 2008 meeting, Ms. Long can be reached via cell phone at 240-281-2386.
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ABOUT THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HUMAN GENETICS Founded in 1948, The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) is the primary professional membership organization for human genetics specialists worldwide. The nearly 8,000 members of ASHG include researchers, academicians, clinicians, laboratory practice professionals, genetic counselors, nurses and others involved in or with a special interest in human genetics.

The Society's mission is to serve research scientists, health professionals and the public by providing forums to: (1) share research results through the Annual Meeting and in The American Journal of Human Genetics (AJHG); (2) advance genetic research by advocating for research support; (3) educate future genetics professionals, health care providers, advocates, teachers, students and the general public about all aspects of human genetics; and (4) promote genetic services and support responsible social and scientific policies. For more information about ASHG, please visit http://www.ashg.org/.

*Please note that all onsite press registrants will be required to provide appropriate press credentials and identification to ASHG Press Office staff before receiving a press badge to access meeting events.

American Society of Human Genetics

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