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Elsevier announces the launch of the Journal of High Energy Astrophysics

October 10, 2013

Amsterdam, October 10, 2013 - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the launch of the Journal of High Energy Astrophysics (JHEAp), the first astrophysical journal that revolves around the study of high energy objects and events.

The Journal of High Energy Astrophysics targets research on energetic phenomena in the universe. Examples of these phenomena include black holes at all scales, neutron stars, pulsars and their nebula, binaries, novae and supernovae, their remnants, active galaxies, and clusters. Launched under favorable conditions, the journal is an attractive addition to the traditional journal landscape in the field. It will offer various gold open access options, embraces the delayed access model, and does not have page charges.

In the belief that boundaries in astronomy are naturally fading, JHEAp aims to publish the most impactful and scientifically rigorous papers, particularly those crossing specialization fields and attracting the interest of astronomers working in any wavelength, ranging from radio waves to gamma-rays. Therefore the journal accepts observational papers on energetic systems across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, papers on other messengers such as cosmic rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves, as well as theoretical papers.

Diego F. Torres, ICREA Professor of Astrophysics at the Institute of Space Sciences in Barcelona, will lead the journal as Editor-in-Chief offering a dedicated platform for this vastly growing field of research. A dedicated group of recognized expert theorists and observers will join him as Associate Editors.

"High energy astrophysics has experienced an explosive development the last few years. Forthcoming experiments from radio to gamma-rays will continue to appeal to new theoretical efforts," said Professor Torres. "They will likely bring as many answers to current questions as new problems and research directions. JHEAp would like to collaborate with the community offering a dedicated setting for publishing on this widely expanding area of science."

"With the launch of this journal we aim to offer a novel alternative to the growing scientific field of high energy astrophysics," added Charon Duermeijer, Publishing Director Physics at Elsevier. "We feel that the Journal of High Energy Astrophysics could play an important role in disseminating this research on a global scale and serving the communities involved better."

All articles published in the journal during the first year will be available for free online at ScienceDirect.
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For more information or to submit an article, go to:JHEAp">http://www.elsevier.com/locate/JHEAp

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciVal, Reaxys, ClinicalKey and Mosby's Suite, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, helping research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world leading provider of professional information solutions. The group employs more than 30,000 people, including more than 15,000 in North America. Reed Elsevier Group PLC is owned equally by two parent companies, Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. Their shares are traded on the London, Amsterdam and New York Stock Exchanges using the following ticker symbols: London: REL; Amsterdam: REN; New York: RUK and ENL.

Media contact

Evalyne Wanjiru
Elsevier
+31 20 485 2098
e.wanjiru@elsevier.com

Elsevier

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