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Media briefing will preview newsworthy research and events anticipated at TCT 2016

October 10, 2016

WHAT: The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will host a special media briefing via conference call to preview this year's TCT, the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The conference will take place October 29 - November 2, 2016 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

Dr. Gregg W. Stone, Director of TCT, will provide an overview of late-breaking trials and first report investigations, as well as noteworthy sessions, keynote speakers, and special events at TCT 2016. Dr. Stone is Professor of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Director of Cardiovascular Research and Education at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, and Co-Director of Medical Research and Education at CRF.

Participants on the call will also be able to take part in a brief Q&A session.

WHEN: Monday, October 17, 2016; 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM (ET)

REGISTRATION: To register for the call, please e-mail jromero@crf.org.

Please note you must be registered as media for TCT 2016 to participate in the media briefing.
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About CRF and TCT

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease.

Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 28th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field.

For more information, visit http://www.crf.org and http://www.tctconference.com.

Cardiovascular Research Foundation

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