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Receptionists could put people off seeing their GP

October 10, 2016

Forty per cent of people say that having to talk through their symptoms with doctors' receptionists could put them off going to their GP, according to an analysis of the Cancer Awareness Measure (CAM)* published today (Tuesday) in the Journal of Public Health.

In a survey of almost 2,000 people** in Great Britain, the most commonly perceived barriers to seeing a GP were finding it difficult to get an appointment with a particular doctor (42 per cent), or at a convenient time (42 per cent), and disliking having to talk to GP receptionists about symptoms (40 percent).

Women were more likely to report these barriers.***

Those from a lower socio-economic background were more likely to report a number of possible 'emotional' barriers like worrying about what the GP might find, having tests and talking about symptoms.

They were also more likely to say they would be put off going to their GP if they couldn't see a particular doctor.

Across all groups, not wanting to be seen as someone who makes a fuss was a commonly perceived barrier to seeking help (35 per cent).

With UK cancer survival lagging behind other developed countries, it's crucial that action is taken to reduce the late diagnosis of cancer.

Dr Richard Roope, Cancer Research UK's GP expert, said: "Diagnosing cancer early is something we have to take seriously, so anything that might prevent people from getting their symptoms checked needs to be overcome.

"We need to ensure that patients are able to get appointments at a convenient time, can book an appointment to see a particular doctor and aren't put off coming to see them in the first place. This may mean more emphasis on training front desk staff including receptionists to deal more sensitively with patients.

"And it's vital that the recent investment from Government is used to attract talented people into the medical profession, which will boost the GP shortage. We need more doctors to cope with the growing number of people walking through their doors."

Dr Jodie Moffat, lead author and head of early diagnosis at Cancer Research UK, said: "There's still more to learn about the things that may put people off going to their doctor, and how important they are when it comes to actually influencing behaviour.

"But it's clear that a new sign or symptom, or something that has stayed or got worse over time, needs to be checked out by a GP. Don't let anything put you off. The chances of surviving cancer are greater when it's caught at an early stage, before it's had a chance to spread, and seeking help sooner rather than later could make all the difference."
-end-
For media enquiries contact Stephanie McClellan in the Cancer Research UK press office on 020 3469 5314 or, out of hours, on 07050 264 059.

Notes to editor:

* Moffat, J. et al. Identifying anticipated barriers to help-seeking to promote earlier diagnosis of cancer in Great Britain. Journal of Public Health. Doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.08.012

** Representative sample of the general population

***
I don't like having to talk to the GP receptionist about my symptoms Men 36.6% Women 42.6%
I find it difficult to get an appointment with a particular doctor Men 36.5% Women 47.5%
I find it difficult to get an appointment with a doctor at a convenient time Men 40.7% Women 44.9%

The Government has committed to spend more on GP services each year in England - increasing over the next five years to reach an extra £2.4 billion in year 2021. https://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/gpfv/

About Cancer Research UK
  • Cancer Research UK is the world's leading cancer charity dedicated to saving lives through research.
  • Cancer Research UK's pioneering work into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer has helped save millions of lives.
  • Cancer Research UK receives no government funding for its life-saving research. Every step it makes towards beating cancer relies on every pound donated.
  • Cancer Research UK has been at the heart of the progress that has already seen survival in the UK double in the last forty years.
  • Today, 2 in 4 people survive their cancer for at least 10 years. Cancer Research UK's ambition is to accelerate progress so that by 2034, 3 in 4 people will survive their cancer for at least 10 years.
  • Cancer Research UK supports research into all aspects of cancer through the work of over 4,000 scientists, doctors and nurses.
  • Together with its partners and supporters, Cancer Research UK's vision is to bring forward the day when all cancers are cured.
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