Nav: Home

Understanding vaping behavior

October 10, 2016

If you are a vaper, scientists want to know how you vape because understanding this is an essential first step to understanding how vaping products are used and the potential they may have to reduce harm caused by smoking.

In the largest study of its kind, scientists from British American Tobacco and Nicoventures have developed a test to examine vaping behaviour and then used it to inform their studies on e-cigarettes. The study results are published in journal Scientific Reports DOI: 10.1038/srep35071.

Understanding vaping behaviour allows scientists to programme vaping machines in the laboratory so that they effectively mimic real world use when a product is being tested. This leads to more accurate machine conditions for e-cigarette testing, which produce more realistic, true to life results. These tests help determine the extent to which e-cigarettes emit toxicants in comparison to conventional cigarettes.

The test used in this study is based on Smoking Analyser (SA7) technology, which was developed initially to measure smokers' puffing behaviour. This is a small portable device that can measure pressure and flow and provides information such as the size and length of a puff and the time between puffs.

Using a modified version, two types of e-cigarette were tested: a rechargeable Vype cig-a-like device, and a Vype ePen, which is a larger, enclosed button-activated device.

Sixty current e-cigarette users participated in the study and attended the testing location on two separate days to use the products provided as they wanted.

'Puffing behaviour was slightly different for the two groups tested,' said Dr James Murphy, Head of Risk Substantiation at British American Tobacco. There was variability across populations for each device so the results represent an average of behaviour. Currently, there are no internationally agreed standardised testing protocols that measure the emissions of e-cigarette aerosols in a life-like manner. Understanding how e-cigarette users vape on their products, however, could help to establish the standardised protocols needed.

The test described here forms part of a framework of tests used in the assessment of next generation products (NGPs). These tests are part of a product stewardship process designed to support the safety and quality of NGPs in development.

Many in the public health community believe e-cigarettes offer great potential for reducing the public health impact of smoking. Public Health England, an executive body of the UK Department of Health, recently published a report saying that the current expert estimate is that using e-cigarettes is around 95% safer than smoking cigarettes, although more research is needed. The Royal College of Physicians have said that the public can be reassured that e-cigarettes are much safer than smoking and that they should be widely promoted as an alternative to cigarettes. Cancer Research UK, Action on Smoking and Health and the British Heart Foundation are also of the view that e-cigarettes are substantially less harmful than smoking.
-end-


R&D at British American Tobacco

Related Smoking Articles:

A case where smoking helped
A mutation in the hemoglobin of a young woman in Germany was found to cause her mild anemia.
No safe level of smoking
People who consistently smoked an average of less than one cigarette per day over their lifetime had a 64 percent higher risk of earlier death than people who never smoked.
Nearly half of women who stop smoking during pregnancy go back to smoking soon after baby is born
A major new review published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that in studies testing the effectiveness of stop-smoking support for pregnant women, nearly half (43 percent) of the women who managed to stay off cigarettes during the pregnancy went back to smoking within six months of the birth.
If you want to quit smoking, do it now
Smokers who try to cut down the amount they smoke before stopping are less likely to quit than those who choose to quit all in one go, Oxford University researchers have found.
Cochrane news: Have national smoking bans worked in reducing harms in passive smoking?
The most robust evidence yet, published today in the Cochrane Library, suggests that national smoking legislation does reduce the harms of passive smoking, and particularly risks from heart disease.
Advocating for raising the smoking age to 21
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21.
Stress main cause of smoking after childbirth
Mothers who quit smoking in pregnancy are more likely to light up again after their baby is born if they feel stressed.
As smoking declines, more are likely to quit
Smokeless tobacco and, more recently, e-cigarettes have been promoted as a harm reduction strategy for smokers who are 'unable or unwilling to quit.' The strategy, embraced by both industry and some public health advocates, is based on the assumption that as smoking declines overall, only those who cannot quit will remain.
Smoking around your toddler could be just as bad as smoking while pregnant
Children whose parents smoked when they were toddlers are likely to have a wider waist and a higher BMI by time they reach ten years of age, reveal researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte Justine Research Centre.
Smoking and angioplasty: Not a good combination
Quitting smoking when you have angioplasty is associated with better quality of life and less chest pain.

Related Smoking Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".