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The 'end of pain': How anesthesia works (video)

October 11, 2016

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11, 2016 -- October 16 is World Anesthesia Day, celebrating the 170th anniversary of the first successful demonstration of surgical anesthesia. Prior to then, surgery was very unpleasant, to put it mildly -- surgeons turned to alcohol, narcotics and even striking their patients on the head to induce unconsciousness. Fortunately, anesthesia now allows tens of thousands of patients every day to avoid the pain and memories of their procedures. But how does anesthesia work? This week, Reactions looks at scientists' current understanding of what happens when you go under. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/1iVWSsIaXGw.
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Related Anesthesia Articles:

Visual recognition memory impaired after multiple exposures to anesthesia during infancy
Repeated exposure to a common anesthesia drug early in life results in visual recognition memory impairment, which emerges after the first year of life and may persist long-term, according to a study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online May 31 in The British Journal of Anaesthesia.
Conscious sedation is a safe alternative to general anesthesia for heart valve procedure
UCLA scientists have found that conscious sedation -- a type of anesthesia in which patients remain awake but are sleepy and pain-free -- is a safe and viable option to general anesthesia for people undergoing a minimally invasive heart procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement.
Access to anesthesia care is not improved when states eliminate physician supervision
Patient access to anesthesia care for seven common surgical procedures is not increased when states 'opt-out' of the Medicare rule that requires anesthesia to be administered with physician supervision, reports a study published in the online first edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.
Anesthesia changes neuronal choreography
Even under deep anesthesia, nerve cells remain highly active. A study conducted by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has shown by high-resolution cellular imaging that local neuronal networks remain active even when the brain is unconscious.
Small association of surgical anesthesia before age 4, later academic performance
A study of children born in Sweden suggests a small association between exposure to anesthesia for surgery before the age 4 with slightly lower school grades at age 16 and slightly lower IQ scores at 18, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
Anesthesia sedation practices for patients in the pediatric congenital cardiac cath lab
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) and the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society (CCAS), today published recommendations for institutions and physicians diagnosing and treating pediatric patients in the catheterization laboratory.
More Americans undergo procedures involving anesthesia outside of O.R.
More than one-third of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia now have them outside of the operating room (O.R.), an increase of 27 percent in five years, according to an analysis of a large registry being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2016 annual meeting.
The 'end of pain': How anesthesia works (video)
Anesthesia now allows tens of thousands of patients every day to avoid the pain and memories of their procedures.
Compound shown to reduce brain damage caused by anesthesia in early study
An experimental drug prevented learning deficits in young mice exposed repeatedly to anesthesia.
Anesthesia is safe in the young, study finds
A single exposure to general anesthesia poses no cognitive risk to healthy children under age three, a critical time in brain development, according to a multicenter study led by Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital.

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