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Exercise beneficial to those with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump

October 11, 2016

Putnam Valley, NY. (October 11, 2016) - Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients on insulin pumps stand to benefit by engaging in aerobic exercise, said a team researchers who conducted a three-month observational study on two groups of diabetes patients. When compared to patients in the study who did not exercise, patients in the study group who engaged in aerobic exercise benefited by improving their metabolic control, reducing their insulin requirement, and a saw a reduction in the number of hyperglycemic events they experienced.

The study, carried out by a team of researchers in Milan, Italy, and Miami, Florida, will be published in a future issue of Cell Transplantation and is currently freely available on-line as an unedited, early epub at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/pre-prints/content-ct-1653_luzi_et_al

The clinical study focused on middle-aged T1D patients on insulin pump therapy and aimed at gathering data on metabolic activity, and inflammatory and autoimmune parameters. Having conducted similar studies previously with animals modeled with T1D, the researchers hypothesized that aerobic, physical activity might also positively regulate autoimmunity and help prevent diabetes-related complications in humans.

"We found that being physically active can improve glycemic control for patients with type 1 diabetes," said study co-author Dr. Livio Luzi of the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida and the Metabolism Research Center at IRCCS Policlinico San Donato in San Donato Milanese, Italy, who worked with colleagues based in Milan, Italy. "Our results suggest that an educational program addressed to T1D patients, and focused on insulin injecting monitoring, diet, and exercise, is highly advantageous for management of T1D. "

According to the researchers, the six patients in the exercise arm of the study (ACT) when compared to the seven study patients that did not exercise and were sedentary (SED), seemed to have more responsible behavior in monitoring their glucose levels.

They concluded that further studies with larger groups of participants should be carried out, but that their results on a small number of patients should be considered "primary predictors of exercise-induced metabolic improvements in T1D patients."

"The current study provides physiological data that demonstrate exercise is an important factor in improving and managing type 1 diabetes," said Rodolfo Alejandro of the University of Miami School of Medicine in Miami, Florida and section editor for Cell Transplantation. "With the increasing rate of diabetes, including an exercise program as part of treatment is highly recommended and, when coupled with insulin therapy, may yield better results for patients. Future studies should explore mechanisms of action related to exercise-mediated immunomodulation with a larger sample of the population."
-end-
Contact: Dr. Livio Luzi, Piazza Edmundo Malan, 1 20097 San Donato Milanese

Email: livio.luzi@unimi.it

Tel: + 39 02 5277 4635

Fax: + 39 02 26437869

Citation: Adamo M, Codella R, Casiraghi F, Ferrulli A, Macri C, Bazzigalupppi E, Terruzzi I, Inverardi L, Ricordi C, Luzi L. Acitve subjects with autoimmune type 1 diabetes have better metabolic profiles than sedentary controls. Cell Transplant. Appeared or available on-line: September 20, 2016.

The Co-Editors-in-Chief for CELL TRANSPLANTATION are at the Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA and the Center for Neuropsychiatry, China Medical University Hospital, TaiChung, Taiwan. Contact: Paul R. Sanberg at psanberg@health.usf.edu, Shinn-Zong Lin at shinnzong@yahoo.com.tw, or Associate Editor Samantha Portis at celltransplantation@gmail.com

News release by Florida Science Communications http://www.sciencescribe.net

Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

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