Nav: Home

The healing effect of fecal microbiota transplantation lasts for long

October 11, 2016

The researchers in the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital have studied in detail the intestinal microbiota of 14 patients treated with a faecal microbiota transplant. The patients suffered from recurrent Clostridium difficile -infection, also known as antibiotic associated diarrhoea, and they had not responded to antibiotic treatment. After the faecal microbiota transplantation therapy, the patient's microbiota was followed for a year.

The researchers found out that the patient's intestinal microbiota highly resembled the donor's microbiota and this composition remained stable through-out the 1-year follow-up period.

"Our results suggest that intestinal microbiota can be modified relatively permanently. This opens new possibilities to the use this treatment for other diseases related to microbial dysbiosis", says Academy Research Fellow Reetta Satokari from the University of Helsinki.

The researchers also wanted to find out which bacteria among the diverse microbial community are the key species behind the treatment success. In order to understand this, they investigated which bacteria were commonly transferred from the donors to all of the patients. In the future, the promising bacterial species will be isolated and characterised for the design of bacteriotherapy products.

"The aim is to develop a so-called bacterial cocktail that could be used to treat patients instead of the faecal material", the post-doctoral researcher Jonna Jalanka outlines.

Reetta Satokari's group has an interesting ongoing project where they look at the effects of faecal microbiota transplant on antibiotic resistance genes detected in the patient's microbiota. The group just published a study where they showed that the transplant decreases the amount of antibiotic resistant genes found in the patient´s intestinal microbiota. "This is a very important finding because resistance to antibiotics is a big problem and resistant bacterial strains are often found in the intestine", says Dr. Satokari.

WHO IS A GOOD DONOR?

Faecal microbiota transplantation is an established treatment method for severe antibiotic associated diarrhoea where medical treatment has not cleared the infection. It has a high success rate, where over 90% of the patients are cured.

"We treat patients with this method in all university hospitals and most of the central hospitals in Finland", tells Chief Physician Perttu Arkkila from the Helsinki University Hospital endoscopy unit. "Currently, we have ongoing clinical trials where we are investigating the effect of faecal microbiota transplantation in treating irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease."

Dr. Arkkila also told that the patients are very eager to enrol the trials since they have often suffered from their condition for a long time and have not found a relief.

The prospective donors are selected carefully. They should be in good general health, normal weight and not have had any antibiotics for the past half a year. Also all donors are tested carefully to exclude several diseases.

Reetta Satokari's group and the hospital clinicians have in collaboration created a unique "faecal bank" where the tested transplants are kept. "Our international colleagues have said to be jealous of this", laughs Dr. Satokari. "We aim to share our well received method of regular donors and frozen transplants to other Finnish hospitals. I have just received a grant for this purpose from the Key Project Funding by the Academy of Finland."

POWERFUL MICROBES

The importance of the intestinal microbiota for human health has just recently been unfolded. The relationship between the human health and intestinal microbiota has been widely investigated and it has been recently linked with several different conditions, including overweight.

- This is currently a very hot research topic, states Dr. Satokari.
-end-


University of Helsinki

Related Antibiotic Articles:

Why using antibiotic eye drops for pinkeye is the wrong way to go
Using antibiotic eye drops for pinkeye is often the wrong way to go but 60 percent of patients nationwide are getting prescriptions for the common eye infection that typically clears up on its own.
Comparison of antibiotic treatments for cellulitis
Among patients with uncomplicated cellulitis, the use of an antibiotic regimen with activity against MRSA did not result in higher rates of clinical resolution compared to an antibiotic lacking MRSA activity; however, certain findings suggest further research may be needed to confirm these results, according to a study published by JAMA.
Antibiotic therapy for nearly 1 in 4 adults with pneumonia does not work
Approximately one in four (22.1 percent) adults prescribed an antibiotic in an outpatient setting (such as a doctor's office) for community-acquired pneumonia does not respond to treatment, according to a new study presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
Key to 'superbug' antibiotic resistance discovered
An international study led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute has discovered the molecular mechanism by which the potentially deadly superbug 'Golden Staph' evades antibiotic treatment, providing the first important clues on how to counter superbug antibiotic resistance.
Lighting up antibiotic resistance
Carbapenems are among the 'antibiotics of last resort' and can fight infections for which other drugs have long lost their effectiveness.
How to solve a problem like antibiotic resistance
There has been much recent talk about how to target the rising tide of antibiotic resistance across the world, one of the biggest threats to global health today.
Encouraging signs for potential new antibiotic
A study published online today (Feb. 17, 2017) in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, reveals strong evidence that the first in a new class of antibiotic is as effective as an established antimicrobial agent in the fight against infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria.
Scientists develop new antibiotic for gonorrhea
Scientists at the University of York have harnessed the therapeutic effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules to develop a new antibiotic which could be used to treat the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea.
Antibiotic resistance just became more complex
Bacteria that are susceptible to antibiotics can survive when enough resistant cells around them are expressing an antibiotic-deactivating factor.
How bacteria survive antibiotic treatment
Multiresistant bacteria scientists around the world are working hard to win the battle against multi-resistant bacteria.

Related Antibiotic Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".