Nav: Home

Safety, not food, entices geese to cities

October 11, 2017

Canada Geese have shifted their winter range northward in recent years by taking advantage of conditions in urban areas--but what specific features of cities make this possible? A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that rather than food, geese are seeking safety, congregating in areas where they can avoid hunters and be buffered from the coldest winter temperatures.

Heath Hagy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his colleagues captured 41 geese in the Greater Chicago Metropolitan Area between 2014 and 2016 and fitted them with radio transmitters to track their movements. While the geese used a remarkable variety of urban habitats, they preferred deep water and rivers over green space such as parks when temperatures dropped enough to tax their ability to maintain their body temperature. For geese that remained within the metropolitan area, winter survival was 100%, but this dropped to 48% for those that emigrated out to forage in surrounding agricultural fields, countering expectations that the proximity of agricultural habitat may be a factor in geese's winter expansion in the area. Together, these results suggest that sanctuary may be a higher priority for wintering geese than good foraging habitat.

Better understanding how geese use urban habitat in winter may help reduce human-wildlife conflicts such as collisions with airplanes. "The growth of urban areas and northward expansion of row-crop agriculture have changed the way geese migrate. Unfortunately, some of our large cities have become goose sanctuaries, where resident geese and migratory geese congregate during winter to escape hunting pressure," says Hagy. "Although additional research is needed, our data will be useful to guide goose harassment efforts, which may offset the benefits of remaining inside urban areas during winter and open hunting seasons."

"This work offers comprehensive insights into the biology and behavior of a large wintering population of Canada geese that inhabits a major metropolitan area in the mid-western U.S. Appropriately grounded in an energetic context, the study thoroughly describes how Canada geese utilize the urban environment under varying weather conditions and demonstrates the survival benefits of urban adaptation," according to The Ohio State University's Robert Gates, a wildlife management expert who was not involved in the research. "Findings from this study provide a firm biological grounding for the development and implementation of management actions to alleviate human-Canada goose conflicts in urban areas."
-end-
"Survival and habitat selection of Canada Geese during autumn and winter in metropolitan Chicago, USA" will be available October 11, 2017, at http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1650/CONDOR-16-234.1 (issue URL http://www.bioone.org/toc/cond/119/4).

About the journal: The Condor: Ornithological Applications is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology. It began in 1899 as the journal of the Cooper Ornithological Club, a group of ornithologists in California that became the Cooper Ornithological Society, which merged with the American Ornithologists' Union in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. The Condor had the top impact factor among ornithology journals for 2016.

American Ornithological Society Publications Office

Related Biology Articles:

Structural biology: Special delivery
Bulky globular proteins require specialized transport systems for insertion into membranes.
Cell biology: All in a flash!
Scientists of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed a tool to eliminate essential proteins from cells with a flash of light.
A biology boost
Assistance during the first years of a biology major leads to higher retention of first-generation students.
Cell biology: Compartments and complexity
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant.
Cell biology: The complexity of division by two
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division.
Cell biology: Dynamics of microtubules
Filamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport.
The biology of color
Scientists are on a threshold of a new era of color science with regard to animals, according to a comprehensive review of the field by a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by professor Tim Caro at UC Davis.
Kinky biology
How and why proteins fold is a problem that has implications for protein design and therapeutics.
A new tool to decipher evolutionary biology
A new bioinformatics tool to compare genome data has been developed by teams from the Max F.
Biology's need for speed tolerates a few mistakes
In balancing speed and accuracy to duplicate DNA and produce proteins, Rice University researchers find evolution determined that speed is favored much more.
More Biology News and Biology Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Uncharted
There's so much we've yet to explore–from outer space to the deep ocean to our own brains. This hour, Manoush goes on a journey through those uncharted places, led by TED Science Curator David Biello.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 1: Numbers
In a recent Radiolab group huddle, with coronavirus unraveling around us, the team found themselves grappling with all the numbers connected to COVID-19. Our new found 6 foot bubbles of personal space. Three percent mortality rate (or 1, or 2, or 4). 7,000 cases (now, much much more). So in the wake of that meeting, we reflect on the onslaught of numbers - what they reveal, and what they hide.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.