Research letter examines evolving standards of beauty

October 11, 2017

A new research letter published by JAMA Dermatology analyzes People magazine's World's Most Beautiful list to compare standards of beauty in 1990 with the present day.

Neelam A. Vashi, M.D., of the Boston University School of Medicine, and coauthors compared 50 celebrities from the 1990 list with 135 celebrities from the 2017 list. Researchers extracted information from the list for age, sex, race, skin type, hair color, eye color and any visible dermatologic conditions.

The authors report:"As evidenced by our data and contrary to our hypothesis, at present, a wider variety of skin colors and inclusion of older age groups are represented among those deemed to be the most beautiful. ... The mass media platform has for years introduced certain criteria for what constitutes beauty. Through an examination of the WMB [World's Most Beautiful] issue of People, we found that these beauty standards are evolving as people learn how to integrate the effects of media with exposure to new cultures and different norms," the article concludes.
-end-
For more details and to read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.3693)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Age Articles from Brightsurf:

From puppyhood to senior age: Different personality traits age differently
Dogs' personality changes over time, but these changes occur unevenly during the dogs' life, and each trait follows a distinct age trajectory.

Age does not contribute to COVID-19 susceptibility
Scientists have estimated that the age of an individual does not indicate how likely they are to be infected by SARS-CoV-2.

How we age
It is well understood that mortality rates increase with age.

When you're 84...What should life look like as we age?
What will your life look like when you're 84? When a health system leader put that question to Lewis A.

Age matters: Paternal age and the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in children
It is no secret that genetic factors play a role in determining whether children have neurodevelopmental disorders.

'Frailty' from age 40 -- what to look out for
With all eyes on avoiding major illness this year, health researchers are urging people as young as 40 to build physical and mental health to reduce or even avoid 'frailty' and higher mortality risk.

Why life can get better as we age -- study
People say life gets better with age. Now research suggests this may be because older people have the wisdom and time to use mindfulness as a means to improve wellbeing.

What causes an ice age to end?
Research by an international team helps to resolve some of the mystery of why ice ages end by establishing when they end.

New evidence of the Sahara's age
The Sahara Desert is vast, generously dusty, and surprisingly shy about its age.

Why sex becomes less satisfying with age
The number of women regularly having sex declines with age, and the number of women enjoying sex postmenopause is even lower.

Read More: Age News and Age Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.