Weight loss surgery in obese diabetic patients significantly cuts pancreatic cancer risk

October 11, 2020

(Vienna, October 12, 2020) Weight loss surgery significantly cuts the risk of developing pancreatic cancer in people who are obese with diabetes, a new 20-year analysis has found.

The study, presented today at UEG Week 2020 Virtual, analysed 1,435,350 patients with concurrent diabetes and obesity over a 20-year period. A total of 10,620 patients within the study had undergone bariatric (weight loss) surgery, an operation that helps patients lose weight by making changes to the digestive system.

The research found that obese patients with diabetes were significantly less likely to develop pancreatic cancer if they had undergone bariatric surgery (prevalence of 0.32% vs 0.19%, p<0.05). The majority of patients (73%) that underwent surgery within the study were female.

Lead author Dr Aslam Syed, from the Allegheny Health Network, Division of Gastroenterology in Pittsburgh, USA, commented, "Obesity and diabetes are well-known risk factors for pancreatic cancer via chronic inflammation, excess hormones and growth factors released by body fat. Previously, bariatric surgery has been shown to improve high blood sugar levels in diabetic patients and our research shows that this surgery is a viable way in reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer in this growing, at-risk group."

The findings are particularly timely, with rates of diabetes, obesity and pancreatic cancer all on the rise.

For pancreatic cancer, cases in the EU increased by 5% between 1990 and 2016 - the highest increase in the EU's top five cancers - with the disease expected to be the second leading cause of cancer death in the near future. A total of 46,200 people are estimated to die from the disease in Europe in 2020, compared to 42,200 deaths recorded in 2015. The increase in cases is believed to be fuelled by rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Obesity rates continue to increase at a rapid and concerning pace across Europe, with little expectation that these figures will decrease or plateau. Over half (52%) of the adult EU population is either overweight or obese, with growing rates also prevalent in children.

Dr Syed explains how preventing pancreatic cancer is crucial, with a lack of improvements in the survival of the disease for four decades. "The average survival time at diagnosis is particularly bleak for this silent killer, at just 4.6 months, with patients losing 98% of their healthy life expectancy. Only 3% of patients survive more than five years."

Often referred to as the 'silent killer', symptoms of pancreatic cancer - which include pain in the back or stomach, jaundice and unexplained weight loss - can be hard to identify which adds difficulties in diagnosing patients early.

"Clinicians should consider bariatric surgery in patients with metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity, to help reduce the risk and burden of pancreatic cancer," adds Dr Syed.
-end-
Notes to Editors

For further information, or to arrange an interview with Dr Aslam Syed, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

We kindly ask that a reference to UEG is included when communicating any information within this press release.

About Dr Aslam Syed

Dr Aslam Syed is a second year gastroenterology fellow at the Allegheny Health Network in Pittsburgh, United States. He is interested in obesity, nutrition, and bariatric endoscopy.

About UEG

UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European medical specialist and national societies focusing on digestive health.

Our member societies represent more than 30,000 specialists from every field of gastroenterology. Together, we provide services for all healthcare professionals and researchers, in the broad area of digestive health. The role of UEG is to take concerted efforts to learn more about digestive disease by prevention, research, diagnosis, cure and raising awareness of their importance.

To advance the standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across the world and to reduce the burden of digestive diseases, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including:

* UEG Week: Organising the best international multidisciplinary gastroenterology congress in the world.

* UEG Research: Supporting cooperation and excellence in digestive health research.

* UEG Journal: Delivering clinical information for digestive health with authority.

* UEG Education: Providing learning opportunities in multiple formats.

* Quality of Care: Improving clinical practice to reduce health inequalities across Europe.

* Public Affairs: Acting as the united voice of European Gastroenterology towards the public and policy makers.

Find out more about UEG's work by visiting http://www.ueg.eu or contact:

Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

Follow UEG on Twitter

References:

1. Syed A., BARIATRIC SURGERY DECREASES PREVALENCE OF PANCREATIC CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH PRIOR DIABETES AND OBESITY: A 20-YEAR NATIONAL ANALYSIS. Presented at UEG Week Virtual 2020.

2. https://ueg.eu/files/771/b7ee6f5f9aa5cd17ca1aea43ce848496.pdf

3. https://www.annalsofoncology.org/article/S0923-7534(20)36056-7/fulltext 4. https://ueg.eu/files/333/310dcbbf4cce62f762a2aaa148d556bd.pdf

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