COVID-related delays to CRC screening causing 11.9% rise in death rates, research reveals

October 11, 2020

(Vienna, October 12, 2020) New research presented today at UEG Week Virtual 2020 has shown that delays in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening caused by COVID-19 has resulted in significantly increased death rates for the cancer.

Researchers at the University of Bologna produced a model to forecast the impact of time delays in CRC screening on CRC mortality caused by COVID-19. The results found that moderate (7-12 months) and large (>12 months) delays in screening caused a 3% and 7% increase in advanced stage CRC respectively.

Based on survival rates at 5 years for stage III-IV CRC, the results showed a significant 11.9% increase in deaths when comparing a 0-3 month delay to a >12 month delay.

CRC (or bowel cancer) is Europe's second largest cancer killer and the most common digestive cancer. Annually, there are 375,000 newly diagnosed cases in the EU and it claims the lives of over 170,000 people.

Screening aids the early detection of CRC, and since the rollout of screening programmes across Europe there has been a steady decline in mortality rates. However, since the start of the pandemic, screening programmes have been suspended in many areas across Europe.

Led author of the study, Professor Luigi Ricciardiello, comments, "Across the globe, healthcare systems are facing serious difficulties while dealing with COVID-19 and it is imperative that support is given to the public and patients throughout the crisis, including for high-impact diseases such as colorectal cancer. Healthcare authorities need to act urgently on how they reorganise activities during COVID-19, without compromising the diagnosis of other high-impact diseases like this research shows."

Unhealthy lifestyles, such as diets high in processed foods, smoking and heavy alcohol consumption are linked to the development of CRC. Symptoms include persistent rectal bleeding, a change in bowel habits, abdominal pain and unexplained weight loss.

"Early-stage diagnosis of colorectal cancer is crucial - it's far easier to treat and enhances optimal patient outcomes", adds Professor Ricciardiello. "It is therefore essential that vital diagnosis tools, like screening programmes, continue and help to prevent mortality rates from rising even further."
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Notes to Editors

For further information, or to arrange an interview with Professor Luigi Ricciardiello, please contact Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

We kindly ask that a reference to UEG is included when communicating any information within this press release.

About Professor Luigi Ricciardiello

Professor Luigi Ricciardiello is from the University of Bologna, Medical and Surgical Sciences, Bologna, Italy. He is the Chair of the UEG Research Committee.

About UEG

UEG, or United European Gastroenterology, is a professional non-profit organisation combining all the leading European medical specialist and national societies focusing on digestive health.

Our member societies represent more than 30,000 specialists from every field of gastroenterology. Together, we provide services for all healthcare professionals and researchers, in the broad area of digestive health. The role of UEG is to take concerted efforts to learn more about digestive disease by prevention, research, diagnosis, cure and raising awareness of their importance.

To advance the standards of gastroenterological care and knowledge across the world and to reduce the burden of digestive diseases, UEG offers numerous activities and initiatives, including: Find out more about UEG's work by visiting http://www.ueg.eu or contact:

Luke Paskins on +44 (0)1444 811099 or media@ueg.eu

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References:

1. Ricciardiello, L. COVID-19 and GI Estimated effects of screening delay due to Sars-Cov-2 pandemic on colorectal cancer mortality. Presented at UEG Week Virtual 2020.

2. https://ueg.eu/files/1028/3806734b256c27e41ec2c6bffa26d9e7.pdf

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