Lose the weight, not the potatoes

October 12, 2010

Denver, CO., October 12, 2010 - Research just released by the University of California, Davis and the National Center for Food Safety and Technology, Illinois Institute of Technology demonstrates that people can include potatoes in their diet and still lose weight. This research was presented at the Obesity Society's 28th Annual Scientific Meeting October 8-12, 2010.

The study sought to gain a better understanding of the role of potatoes and the glycemic index in weight loss, largely because some have questioned the inclusion of potatoes in a weight loss regimen due to the vegetable's designation as a high glycemic index (HGI) food.

"The results of this study confirm what health professionals and nutrition experts have said for years; when it comes to weight loss, it is not about eliminating a certain food or food groups, rather, it is reducing calories that count," said lead researcher Dr. Britt Burton-Freeman, PhD, MS. "There is no evidence that potatoes, when prepared in a healthful manner, contribute to weight gain. In fact, we are seeing that they can be part of a weight loss program."

Researchers studied 86 overweight men and women over the course of 12 weeks to measure the effects of a reduced-calorie modified glycemic index diet with the addition of potatoes. The subjects were randomly assigned to three groups and each had a diet that included five to seven servings of potatoes per week. The results indicated that all three groups lost weight.

One group was given a list of foods with a low glycemic index (LGI) to include in their diet daily. The second group was given a list of foods with a HGI to include in their diet daily. Both groups were to reduce their daily caloric intake by 500 calories while also consuming five to seven servings of potatoes each week. All participants were guided and monitored for compliance by a dietitian to only eat foods on their lists or like foods along with the provided potatoes.

Participants in the third group - called the "control group" - were allowed to choose their daily meals and caloric intake on their own, but were encouraged to adhere to the U.S. dietary guidelines and the food guide pyramid. The only requirement of the third group was - like the other two groups - they had to include five to seven servings of potatoes each week.

All subjects were provided recipes and counseled accordingly for successful dietary adherence. The results indicated that all three groups lost weight and there was no significant difference in weight lost between the low and high glycemic index groups.

This is good news for potato lovers and any consumer who craves the satisfaction of wholesome yet healthy meal options. One medium-size (5.3 ounce) skin-on potato contains just 110 calories per serving, boasts more potassium (620g) than a banana, provides almost half the daily value of vitamin C (45 percent), and contains no fat, sodium or cholesterol.

"We're thrilled with the results of this study," says Kathleen Triou, vice president of domestic marketing for the United States Potato Board (USPB). "For the last few years the humble spud has been vilified in respect to its weight management properties. Now we realize that it should be glorified for its role in healthy weight loss."
-end-
This study was funded by the USPB. For a list of Quick & Healthy potato recipes, please visit: www.potatogoodness.com.

About the United States Potato Board:

The United States Potato Board was established in 1971 by a group of potato growers to promote the benefits of eating potatoes. Recognized as an innovator in the produce marketing industry, the USPB adopted a new campaign in 2008. "Potatoes... Goodness Unearthed®" showcases the appeal of naturally nutrient-rich potatoes, also known as America's favorite vegetable. Based in Denver, Colo., the USPB represents more than 4,000 potato growers and handlers across the country. To unearth more goodness about the USPB and its programs, visit www.potatogoodness.com.

For a copy of the research abstract, contact Meredith Myers at 303-873-2333 or meredithm@uspotatoes.com.

Fleishman-Hillard, Inc.

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