J. Marc Overhage elected to Institute of Medicine

October 12, 2010

INDIANAPOLIS - J. Marc Overhage, M.D., Ph.D., a national leader in the development and implementation of electronic medical records and health information exchange, has been elected to the prestigious Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Overhage is at the forefront of policy, standards, financing and expansion of the secure accumulation and exchange of medical data to improve patient care delivery and safety. He is director of medical informatics at the Regenstrief Institute and Sam Regenstrief Professor of Medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He also founded the Indiana Health Information Exchange, which provides hospitals and doctors' offices with information from hospitalizations, doctors' offices, test results, immunization data and other information critical to patient care.

Dr. Overhage has spent over 25 years at the Regenstrief Institute developing and implementing clinical health information systems and evaluating their performance and value for improving the quality and efficiency of health care. Working with Clement McDonald, M.D., a pioneer of medical informatics at Regenstrief and himself an IOM member, Dr. Overhage expanded the capabilities of the ground-breaking Regenstrief Medical Record System and created the Indiana Network for Patient Care, an electronic patient record system containing data from laboratories, pharmacies, hospitals and long term care facilities throughout Indiana. INPC is now the highest volume health information exchange in the nation.

Dr. Overhage is also an expert in using computers, especially computer-based order-writing, to improve decision-making by doctors and other health care providers. He is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics and the American College of Physicians. He is a board member of the National Quality Forum (NQF) and a member of the Health Information Technology Standards Committee and the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, both statutory advisory committees of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

"Marc Overhage is the national leader in health information exchange, which will allow health care providers to get the most value from the electronic medical record systems now being implemented nationally in many hospitals and doctors' offices," said William Tierney, M.D., president of the Regenstrief Institute, associate dean for healthcare effectiveness research at the IU School of Medicine and an IOM member.

Dr. Overhage is among 65 new IOM members nationally. With the addition of those elected in 2010, IOM now has 1649 active members. Members are elected through a highly selective process that recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.

A graduate of Wabash College, Dr. Overhage received his Ph.D. in biophysics and his M.D. from the IU School of Medicine, where he also completed his residency. He was a medical informatics fellow at the Regenstrief Institute. The IU School of Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute are located on the campus of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.
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The Regenstrief Institute, Inc. is a distinguished medical research organization dedicated to improving the quality of health care and is the World Health Organization's first and only Collaborating Center for Medical Informatics. Regenstrief is the home of internationally recognized centers of excellence in medical and public health informatics, aging, health services and health systems research. Institute investigators are faculty members of the IU School of Medicine, other schools at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, or Purdue University.

Indiana University School of Medicine

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