Nav: Home

NASA sees large eye in Hurricane Nicole

October 12, 2016

Hurricane Nicole continues to strengthen as it heads toward Bermuda and a satellite image showed the storm's large eye.

The NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland created an image of Hurricane Nicole at 12 p.m. EDT (1600 UTC) on Oct. 12 that showed it had a large eye.

The storm was well-rounded with feeder bands of thunderstorms wrapped tightly around the eye and from a band east of the center. NOAA manages the GOES series of satellites and the NASA/NOAA GOES Project creates images and animations from the data.

On Oct. 12 a Hurricane Warning is in effect for Bermuda. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that a Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the large eye of Hurricane Nicole was located near about 295 miles (480 km) south-southwest of Bermuda near 28.4 degrees north latitude and 66.9 degrees west longitude. Nicole was moving toward the north near 7 mph (11 kph), and the NHC expects a northward motion with some increase in forward speed is expected today, Oct. 12. A turn toward the north-northeast is forecast tonight, followed by a northeast turn on Thursday with an additional increase in forward speed. On the forecast track, the core of Hurricane Nicole will pass near or over Bermuda on Thursday, Oct. 13.

The latest minimum central pressure reported by an Air Force Reserve reconnaissance aircraft is 969 millibars.

Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph (155 kph) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is possible during the next 24 hours, and Nicole could be near major hurricane strength when it approaches Bermuda.

For updated forecasts, visit the NHC website at: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Eye Articles:

Eye blinking on-a-chip
Researchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have developed a device that moves fluids over corneal cells similarly to the movement of tears over a blinking eye.
Guardian angel of the eye
The lens of the human eye comprises a highly concentrated protein solution, which lends the lens its great refractive power.
Antibody-based eye drops show promise for treating dry eye disease
Researchers have identified the presence of a specific type of antibody, called anti-citrullinated protein autoantibodies, or ACPAs, in human tear fluid.
Left eye? Right eye? American robins have preference when looking at decoy eggs
Just as humans are usually left- or right-handed, other species sometimes prefer one appendage, or eye, over the other.
The algae's third eye
Scientists at the Universities of Würzburg and Bielefeld in Germany have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae.
Making an eye for you
Kyoto University scientists utilize simulations and laboratory experiments to find that cells sense the mechanical forces to form the primordial eye, the optic cup.
A trained eye
UCSB researchers show that category learning can be influenced by where an object is in our field of vision.
Decrease in eye injuries to children
Eye injuries that sent children to emergency departments in the United States decreased from 2006 to 2014, and most eye injuries posed low risk for vision loss.
Increased electrical activity in eye may relieve short-term dry eye pain
A boost of electrical activity in the eye's mucous membranes may lead to new treatments for the painful condition known as dry eye.
An eye toward regeneration
UNLV scientist Kelly Tseng, Ph.D. and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.
More Eye News and Eye Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.