New scientific study finds women more forgiving than men

October 13, 2003

MEDIA ADVISORY Forgiveness research highlights new realities in the battle of the sexes. Women are more likely to forgive than men, but both are equal in seeking revenge. The methods of revenge differ, but time heals and aids forgiveness in both sexes. According to the research, learn about a man's personality and you'll learn how forgiving he'll be. The more extroverted and social a man is, the more likely he is to forgive. Personality traits don't play a role in a woman's ability to forgive.

This study along with some from the world's top scientists in forgiveness research will be presented at the Scientific Conference on Forgiveness October 24-25 in Atlanta. It was conducted by Dr. Ann Macaskill, Reader in Health Psychology, Director Centre for Research on Human Behaviour, School of Social Science and Law, Sheffield Hallam University.

The scientific presentations include the power of forgiving as it affects marriages, health, women, Blacks, religion, businesses, relationships, criminals and victims, substance abusers, and others. The first study to examine brain imaging when making judgments about forgiveness is also presented. See the website press room for a full listing of abstracts at www.forgiving.org.

For complimentary registration information for journalists or to arrange interviews, please visit our website or contact Vicki Robb at 703-329-3356.
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The conference is hosted by A Campaign for Forgiveness Research, a non-profit organization dedicated to facilitating research for personal health, maintaining relationships, peace among nations and biological connections with primates. The research is funded by grants from the John Templeton Foundation, the Fetzer Institute and donations to the Campaign from individuals and family foundations. The Campaign is directed by Everett L. Worthington, Jr. Professor and Chair of Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, and author of "Five Steps to Forgiveness" (Crown Publishers).

Vicki Robb, 703-329-3356
Louisa Mattozzi, 703-476-0742
www.forgiving.org

John Templeton Foundation

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