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Many alcohol-related injuries occur at home

October 13, 2016

Of all alcohol-related injuries in various public hospital emergency departments in Queensland, Australia, more occurred at home than at licensed premises.

Of the 12,296 emergency department visits in 2003 to 2012 for alcohol-related injuries, 36.1 percent occurred at home, 13.0 percent occurred on the street, and 9.8 percent occurred at licensed premises. Men were more likely to be seen at the emergency department for such at-home injuries than females. Of injuries identified as domestic violence by a spouse or partner, 59.5 percent occurred at home.

"The home location is of growing concern due to the upwards trend in drinking and alcohol-related injuries occurring at home, along with the home being an unregulated environment," wrote the authors of the Journal of Clinical Nursing study.
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Wiley

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