CR Magazine sheds light on the burden of cancer on the streets

October 14, 2010

PHILADELPHIA -- An article published in the Ffall 2010 issue of CR, the AACR's magazine for cancer survivors and their families and caregivers, details the immense challenges faced by those who suffer with cancer and lack the necessary resources for proper treatment and care -- the homeless.

CR magazine contributing writer Cynthia Ryan, Ph.D., who is an associate professor of English at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, took to the streets over the last year to offer a glimpse into the lives of homeless cancer patients struggling to obtain treatment while being confronted by daily uncertainties about life's most basic necessities.

What makes this story even more unique is that Ryan, a 17-year breast cancer survivor, can relate firsthand to the harbored fears and uncertainties that many patients experience when diagnosed with cancer.

"Those who experience cancer on the streets brave a constant struggle to find a place where they can belong. ... And while all survivors embark on a journey unlike any other when diagnosed with cancer, the homeless trudge a more treacherous path," Ryan wrote in CR.

Along her journey, Ryan learned more about the complexities of this population than she had thought she would. She developed unique bonds with many homeless cancer patients, but one in particular -- 46-year-old Edwina Sanders, a stage 4 breast cancer patient -- left a lasting impact.

"[The homeless] have challenges beyond just the effects of cancer. People like Edwina simply struggle to find a way to get to their appointments and to get 'home' after chemotherapy," Ryan said in a video podcast with the AACR.

Ryan said that writing this article confirmed her belief that simplifying the experience of cancer to a single narrative of diagnosis, treatment and recovery is not only misleading, but also harmful to those who aren't represented in purely 'hopeful' profiles of survivorship.

"You go into these communities assuming you are going to lift these people up; you're going to help them. What you find in return is they give a lot back to you," she said. "When I see Edwina, I see the face of cancer in all its rawness. She reminds me that cancer is a formidable opponent and that our fight is far from over."
-end-
This October celebrates the 25th Anniversary of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Ryan and Sanders are both available for interviews by contacting the AACR.

To read Ryan's story "Homeless With Cancer," in the Fall fall 2010 issue of CR magazine, please visit: www.CRmagazine.org/archive/Fall2010/Pages/HomelessWithCancer.aspx

To listen to CR's "Cancer on the Streets" audio podcast, please visit: www.CRmagazine.org/archive/Crpodcasts/Pages/CancerontheStreets.aspx

To view the video podcast interview with Ryan, which was conducted during the Third AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities, please visit: www.aacr.org/page22693.aspxThe mission of the American Association for Cancer Research is to prevent and cure cancer. Founded in 1907, the AACR is the world's oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research. The membership includes 32,000 basic, translational and clinical researchers; health care professionals; and cancer survivors and advocates in the United States and more than 90 other countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise from the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer through high-quality scientific and educational programs. It funds innovative, meritorious research grants, research fellowships and career development awards. The AACR Annual Meeting attracts more than 18,000 participants who share the latest discoveries and developments in the field. Special conferences throughout the year present novel data across a wide variety of topics in cancer research, treatment and patient care. The AACR publishes six major peer-reviewed journals: Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Molecular Cancer Research; Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention; and Cancer Prevention Research. The AACR also publishes CR, a magazine for cancer survivors and their families, patient advocates, physicians and scientists, providing a forum for sharing essential, evidence-based information and perspectives on progress in cancer research, survivorship and advocacy.

American Association for Cancer Research

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