New clinical guideline to help clinicians treat circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders

October 14, 2015

DARIEN, IL - A new clinical practice guideline published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine provides clinicians with updated recommendations for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs).

The guideline, which is published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, updates previously published practice parameters for the treatment of advanced sleep-wake phase disorder, delayed sleep-wake phase disorder, non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder. Developed by an expert task force and approved by the AASM board of directors, the guideline was based on a systematic literature review, assessment of the evidence using the GRADE methodology, and meta-analyses.

"This new clinical practice guideline promotes high quality, patient-centered care for people who have an intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder," said AASM President Dr. Nathaniel Watson. "I expect this guideline will catalyze future research that will further our understanding of the treatment of these disorders."

Among the recommendations included in the guideline are: Due to either insufficient or absent data, no recommendations were provided for other treatments such as prescribed sleep-wake scheduling or wakefulness-promoting medications.

It is important for clinicians to note that the new clinical guideline did not update the existing practice parameters for the two circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders that are extrinsic: shift work disorder and jet lag disorder.

According to the AASM, circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders are caused by alterations of the circadian time-keeping system, its entrainment mechanisms, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. While intrinsic disorders are thought to exist predominantly due to innate phenomena, extrinsic disorders predominantly arise from environmental influences.

The AASM reports that the most common presenting symptoms of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders are difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep, and excessive sleepiness. Left untreated, these disorders can cause adverse health outcomes; impairments in social, occupational and educational performance; and safety concerns.
-end-
Help for individuals with an ongoing sleep problem is available at more than 2,500 AASM accredited sleep disorders centers across the U.S. Visit http://www.sleepeducation.org to find a local accredited sleep center and learn more about circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders.

To request a copy of the paper, "Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015," or the editorial, "Do Evidence-Based Treatments for Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders Make the GRADE? Updated Guidelines Point to Need for More Clinical Research," or to arrange an interview with an AASM spokesperson, please contact Communications Coordinator Lynn Celmer at 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, or lcelmer@aasmnet.org.

About the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Established in 1975, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards. The AASM has a combined membership of 11,000 accredited member sleep centers and individual members, including physicians, scientists and other health care professionals (http://www.aasmnet.org).

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Related Sleep Medicine Articles from Brightsurf:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Wind turbine noise affects dream sleep and perceived sleep restoration
Wind turbine noise (WTN) influences people's perception of the restorative effects of sleep, and also has a small but significant effect on dream sleep, otherwise known as REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, a study at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows.

Chronic opioid therapy can disrupt sleep, increase risk of sleep disorders
Patients and medical providers should be aware that chronic opioid use can interfere with sleep by reducing sleep efficiency and increasing the risk of sleep-disordered breathing, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

'Short sleep' gene prevents memory deficits associated with sleep deprivation
The UCSF scientists who identified the two known human genes that promote 'natural short sleep' -- nightly sleep that lasts just four to six hours but leaves people feeling well-rested -- have now discovered a third, and it's also the first gene that's ever been shown to prevent the memory deficits that normally accompany sleep deprivation.

Short sleep duration and sleep variability blunt weight loss
High sleep variability and short sleep duration are associated with difficulties in losing weight and body fat.

Kicking, yelling during sleep? Study finds risk factors for violent sleep disorder
Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published in the Dec.

Sleep health and yoga intervention delivered in low-income communities improves sleep
Pilot study results indicate that a sleep and yoga intervention has promising effects on improving sleep disturbance, sleep-related impairment, and sleep health behaviors.

Sleep better, parent better: Study shows link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting
A new study from Kelly Tu, a human development and family studies researcher at the University of Illinois, and colleagues, looks at the link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting during late adolescence.

To sleep or not: Researchers explore complex genetic network behind sleep duration
Scientists have identified differences in a group of genes they say might help explain why some people need a lot more sleep -- and others less -- than most.

Alternating skimpy sleep with sleep marathons hurts attention, creativity in young adults
Skimping on sleep, followed by 'catch-up' days with long snoozes, is tied to worse cognition -- both in attention and creativity -- in young adults, in particular those tackling major projects, Baylor University researchers have found.

Read More: Sleep Medicine News and Sleep Medicine Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.