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Long-term experience supports efficacy and safety of PRRT for treating neuroendocrine tumors

October 14, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, October 14, 2016--More than ten years of published clinical data and personal experience using PRRT-based targeted therapy of neuroendocrine tumors supports the effectiveness of this novel treatment approach and the ability to minimize and manage potential toxic side effects. A comprehensive review of somatostatin analog peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is published in Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals website until November 11, 2016.

In the article "Myelotoxicity of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy of Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Decade of Experience," Murali Kesavan and J. Harvey Turner, The University of Western Australia (Crawley, Australia), state that PRRT has revolutionized the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors, improving tumor response rates and patients' progression-free survival. However, the associated toxicity to blood cells - with the potential to cause thrombocytopenia and neutropenia and, in the long term, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia - remains a risk and has limited the use of PRRT.

The researchers suggest that PRRT should more readily be considered a first-line agent in appropriate patients. Steps can be taken to minimize the risk of significant long-term effects, such as appropriate timing of therapy, patient selection criteria, dose optimization, and adequate monitoring.

"This is an important discussion of the efficacy and toxicity issues relating to the use of PRRT, as the therapy becomes more widely available for the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs," says Co-Editor-in-Chief Donald J. Buchsbaum, PhD, Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham.
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About the Journal

Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, published 10 times per online with open access options and in print, is under the editorial leadership of Co-Editors-in-Chief Donald J. Buchsbaum, PhD, Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Robert K. Oldham, MD, CAMC-Teay's Valley Cancer Center. Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals is the only journal with a specific focus on cancer biotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, cytokine therapy, cancer gene therapy, cell-based therapies, and other forms of immunotherapy. The Journal includes extensive reporting on advancements in radioimmunotherapy and the use of radiopharmaceuticals and radiolabeled peptides for the development of new cancer treatments. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticalswebsite.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research, Human Gene Therapy, and Stem Cells and Development. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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