Olympus introduces new medical devices designed for laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery

October 15, 2009

CENTER VALLEY, Pa., October 15, 2009 - Olympus, a precision technology leader, creating innovative opto-digital solutions in healthcare, life science and consumer electronics products, today introduced three new surgical instruments specifically designed for Laparo-Endoscopic Single-Site (LESS) surgery. LESS surgery is an advanced, minimally invasive surgical technique in which an endoscope and hand instruments are inserted through an access port via a single incision often made in the navel.

The three new devices now commercially available include the QuadPort™, a disposable multi-instrument access port that can simultaneously accommodate up to four instruments, including a laparoscope, through a single incision; the HiQ LS curved 5-mm diameter hand instruments, which feature a shaft with curved distal and proximal ends to prevent interference with other LESS surgical devices inside the body; and the EndoEYE® LS Laparo-Thoraco Videoscope, which incorporates a deflectable control section to help prevent interference with other devices externally.

The QuadPort, which features four ports, one 15mm, two 10mm, and one 5mm, allows the surgeon to insert up to four instruments into a single incision. As a result, the QuadPort also allows more room for increased maneuverability and it allows larger specimens to be extracted.

While traditional laparoscopic surgery offers benefits like less pain, faster recovery time, and improved cosmesis over open surgery, LESS surgery has the potential to extend these benefits even further because it allows surgeons the ability to perform procedures through only one small incision in the bellybutton. There is still much to be learned about this emerging technology in order to demonstrate its benefits and risks. It is important to note that LESS surgery is technically challenging, can carry added risk potential and may not be appropriate for all patients and, for some patients, additional incisions or open surgery may be required.
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For additional information on LESS surgery go to: http://www.olympusamerica.com/less/

About Olympus Medical Systems Group

Olympus is transforming the future of healthcare by advancing less invasive procedures. Olympus, which incorporates surgical market leader Gyrus ACMI, provides knowledge and solutions in advanced diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy, early-stage cancer evaluation and treatment, and innovative, less invasive surgical procedures. Olympus is dedicated to developing solutions for customers that help provide earlier detection, improved outcomes and enhanced quality of life for patients.

About Olympus

Olympus is a precision technology leader, creating innovative opto-digital solutions in healthcare, life science and consumer electronics products.

Olympus works collaboratively with its customers and its affiliates worldwide to leverage R&D investment in precision technology and manufacturing processes across diverse business lines. These include: Olympus serves the healthcare field with integrated product solutions and financial, educational and consulting services that help customers to efficiently, reliably and more easily achieve exceptional results. Olympus develops breakthrough technologies with revolutionary product design and functionality for the consumer and professional photography markets, and also is the leader in gastrointestinal endoscopy and clinical and educational microscopes. For more information, visit www.olympusamerica.com.

GolinHarris International

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