Springer and the New York Botanical Garden Press join forces to publish botanical journals

October 16, 2007

Springer and The New York Botanical Garden announce a partnership to publish The Botanical Review, Brittonia, and Economic Botany beginning in 2008. The New York Botanical Garden Press previously self-published these quarterly journals, starting with Brittonia in 1931.

For over half a century, The Botanical Review has been a leading international journal noted for its in-depth articles on a broad spectrum of botanical fields including systematics, phytogeography, evolution, physiology, ecology, morphology, paleobotany and anatomy.

Brittonia, published since 1931, is an important outlet for the publication of original research articles on a variety of botanical topics. It contains papers by the staff of the Botanical Garden and outside contributors, as well as book reviews, announcements and news.

Interdisciplinary in scope, Economic Botany bridges the gap between pure and applied botany by focusing on the uses of plants by people. The foremost publication of its kind in this field, it documents the rich relationship that has always existed between plants and humans. First published in 1947, it has been the official publication of the Society for Economic Botany since 1959.

James S. Miller, Ph.D., Dean and Vice President for Science at The New York Botanical Garden, said, "We're pleased to collaborate with Springer, a distinguished and leading publisher of journals and books in science. Their global publishing capabilities will help our journals reach a broader audience around the world."

Jacco Flipsen, Editorial Director, Plant Sciences at Springer, said, "We are excited and honored to be able to work together with such a highly respected organization as The New York Botanical Garden. Our co-publishing project will strengthen our position as a leading publisher in plant sciences. At the same time, we will seek out opportunities to increase the visibility of the Botanical Garden and their journals."

The three journals will be available in print and on Springer's online platform www.springerlink.com. All articles will be published online via Online First™ before they appear in print, thereby enabling research results to be disseminated quickly to the scientific community. In addition, all authors, via the Springer Open Choice™ program, have the option of publishing their articles using the open access publishing model. Springer will digitize the back volumes of the journals, making them available to readers through the Springer Online Archives Collection.
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The New York Botanical Garden Press (www.nybgpress.org) has one of the largest publishing programs of any independent botanical garden in the world and provides a means for communication of research carried out by scientists at The New York Botanical Garden and elsewhere. Begun in 1896, the program focuses on advances in knowledge about the classification, utilization, and conservation of plant life.

Springer (www.springer.com) is the second-largest publisher of journals in the science, technology, and medicine (STM) sector and the largest publisher of STM books. It publishes on behalf of more than 300 academic associations and professional societies. Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media, one of the world's leading suppliers of scientific and specialist literature. The group publishes over 1,700 journals and more than 5,500 new books a year, as well as the largest STM eBook Collection worldwide. Springer has operations in over 20 countries in Europe, the USA, and Asia, and some 5,000 employees.

The Botanical Review: ISSN: 0006-8101 (print), ISSN: 1874-9372 (electronic)
Brittonia: ISSN: 0007-196X (print), ISSN: 1938-436x (electronic)
Economic Botany, ISSN: 0013-0001 (print), ISSN: 1874-9364 (electronic)

Springer

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