IOM advisory: improving cancer patients' psychosocial care

October 16, 2007

State-of-the-art detection and treatment have contributed to the ongoing decline in the cancer death rate in the United States. But most cancer patients do not receive care that addresses the psychological and social problems that frequently accompany cancer and its treatment. The psychological, emotional, and social side effects can increase patients' suffering and compromise their ability to follow through on treatment. CANCER CARE FOR THE WHOLE PATIENT: MEETING PSYCHOSOCIAL HEALTH NEEDS, a new report from the Institute of Medicine, outlines an action plan to ensure that patients and their families receive the psychosocial health services they need.

The report will be released publicly at 11 a.m. EDT Tuesday, Oct. 23 and will be the focus of a subsequent symposium on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at which cancer care providers, patient advocates, representatives of organizations that set standards for cancer care, and others will discuss how to implement the report's recommendations.
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REPORTERS: TO OBTAIN A COPY OF THE REPORT OR TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE NOV. 7 SYMPOSIUM, contact the National Academies' Office of News and Public Information at tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu. Advance copies will be available to reporters only beginning at 10 a.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 22. THE REPORT IS EMBARGOED AND NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE BEFORE 11 A.M. EDT ON OCT. 23.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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