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Novel reagent detects memory immune response in vaccinated animals

October 16, 2017

New Rochelle, NY, October 16, 2017--Researchers have developed a novel reagent capable of detecting rare, antigen-specific B cells that indicate successful vaccination in veterinary animals. The method used to create a B cell tetramer that can detect a memory immune response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) will be widely applicable for demonstrating immunity to other veterinary pathogens, and is presented in an article in Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Viral Immunology website.

The article entitled "B Cell Tetramer Development for Veterinary Vaccinology" is part of a special issue on Challenges in Veterinary Vaccines led by Guest Editor Crystal Loving, PhD, USDA-ARS National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA.

Coauthors Michael Rahe, Kevin Gustafson, and Michael Murtaugh, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, described how the nsp7-B cell tetramer can be used to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the characteristics and quality of the memory B cell response generated to PRRSV infection and to vaccination against the virus. The researchers reported that validation studies showed the reagent able to detect PRRSV-specific B cells present at a frequency of about 0.001% of the total B lymphocytes in a vaccinated animal.

"The authors have done a wonderful job of extending B cell tetramer technology to the veterinary immunology field. This approach will be tremendously useful for the study of veterinary vaccines in general," says David L. Woodland, PhD, Editor-in Chief of Viral Immunology and Chief Scientific officer for Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Research reported in this publication was supported by grants from National Institutes of Health under Award Number T32 OD010993. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
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About the Journal

Viral Immunology is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published ten times a year in print and online. Topics cover both human and animal viral immunology, exploring viral-based immunological diseases, pathogenic mechanisms, and virus-associated tumor and cancer immunology. The Journal includes original research papers, review articles, and commentaries covering the spectrum of laboratory and clinical research and exploring developments in vaccines and diagnostics targeting viral infections. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Viral Immunology website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, and Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot St., New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215 http://www.liebertpub.com Phone: (914) 740-2100 (800) M-LIEBERT Fax: (914) 740-2101

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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