Springer expands life science program with In Vitro journals

October 17, 2006

Springer has entered into a partnership with the Society for In Vitro Biology (SIVB) and the International Association for Plant Biotechnology (IAPB, formerly IAPTC&B) to publish their journals In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Animal and In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant. Springer will assume publication of these key journals in January 2007.

Founded in 1965, the In Vitro - Animal and In Vitro - Plant journals are the only ones on the market sponsored by professional societies devoted solely to the in vitro biology of animals and plants. The latest research, techniques and other developments related to the in vitro cultivation of cells, tissues, organs, or tumors from plants and animals, including humans are presented in the journals. With newly designed covers, In Vitro - Animal will be published ten times a year and In Vitro - Plant will appear bi-monthly.

Dr. Dieter Czeschlik, Editorial Director for Life Sciences at Springer, said, "We are proud that the SIVB and the IAPB have entrusted us with the publication of their journals. Previously published by two different companies, the journals will now benefit by having a single publisher. We will increase the journals' worldwide visibility as well as the international impact of the two societies. Of course, we are delighted to join forces with both societies to provide their members with highly professional and fast publication services."

Dr. Paul J. Price, President of SIVB, stated, "Our partnership with Springer guarantees the financial health of the journals, expands their visibility and access, and provides improved editorial support. This represents a major accomplishment for the Society. We now have increased marketing possibilities and the potential for broader circulation, allowing our publications to have a greater impact. Having both journals under the same roof enables other synergies to develop within the sections of our Society."

Dr. Roger N. Beachy, President of IAPB, said, "The recent change that results in publication of the SIVB journals by Springer provides a unique opportunity for the Society. I am particularly pleased that the newly renamed IAPB will communicate to its membership through this medium. Our goal is to further inform the membership of the outcomes of research in plant biology and biotechnology: The partnership with Springer will facilitate this effort."

In Vitro - Animal and In Vitro - Plant will be available online as well as in print. All articles will be published online via Online FirstTM before they appear in print, thereby ensuring the most rapid dissemination possible of research results. In addition, all authors, via the Springer Open Choice program, have the option of publishing their articles using the open access publishing model. Springer will digitize the back volumes of the journal, making them available to readers through the Springer Online Archives Collection.
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About SIVB

With over 1,000 members, the SIVB was founded in 1946 as the Tissue Culture Association to foster exchange of knowledge of in vitro biology of cells, tissues and organs from both plant and animals, including humans. The focus is on biological research, development, and applications of significance to science and society. The mission is accomplished through the Society's publications; national and local conferences, meetings and workshops; and support of teaching initiatives in cooperation with educational institutions.

About IAPB

The forerunner organization to IAPB was founded in 1963 and has over 2,000 members in more than 85 countries. The organization was renamed IAPB in 2006 to more closely reflect the research of its members. Internationally oriented, it is the largest, oldest, and most comprehensive professional organization in its field. Its mission is to promote research in all aspects of basic and applied plant tissue culture and biotechnology through its publications and scientific conferences.

About Springer

Springer is the second-largest publisher worldwide in the science, technology, and medicine (STM) sector. It publishes on behalf of more than 300 academic associations and professional societies. Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media, one of the world's leading suppliers of scientific and specialist literature. The group owns 70 publishing houses, together publishing a total of 1,450 journals and more than 5,000 new books a year. The group operates in over 20 countries in Europe, the USA, and Asia, and has some 5,000 employees. In 2005, it generated annual sales of around EUR 838 million.

Springer

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