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More caffeine from coffee associated with decreased rosacea risk

October 17, 2018

BottomLine: Consuming caffeine from coffee but not from other foods (tea, soda and chocolate) was associated with less risk of rosacea, a common chronic inflammatory skin disease where the skin appears red and flushed. This observational study included more than 82,000 women in the Nurses' Health Study II with data collected on coffee, tea, soda and chocolate consumption. Compared with people who had less than one serving of caffeinated coffee per month, those who had four servings or more per day had the lowest risk for rosacea. Decaffeinated coffee wasn't associated with decreased rosacea risk. Rosacea symptoms may be lessened because of caffeine's vasoconstrictive and immunosuppressant effects but further studies are to needed to understand the reasons for the observed association.

Authors: Wen-Qing Li, Ph.D., of the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, and coauthors

Related Material: The editorial, "One More Reason to Continue Drinking Coffee - It May Be Good for Your Skin," by Mackenzie R. Wehner, M.D., M.Phil., of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Eleni Linos, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., of the University of California, San Francisco, also is  available on the For The Media website.

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.3301)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.3301

JAMA Dermatology

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