A new approach to tackle superbugs

October 17, 2019

Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients.

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a bacterial pathogen carried by 4.4 billion people worldwide, with the highest prevalence in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Although the majority of infections show no symptoms, if left untreated the pathogen can cause chronic inflammation of the stomach lining, ulcers and is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer.

In 2017, the World Health Organisation included H. pylori on its list of antibiotic-resistant "priority pathogens" - a catalogue of bacteria that pose the greatest threat to human health and that urgently need new treatments.

Current treatments involve multi-target therapy with a combination of antibiotics, but this has promoted the emergence of resistant strains.

Now, UK and German scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach using only food- and pharmaceutical-grade ingredients, which are non-toxic and safe for consumption, to be used as a supplement to complement antibiotic current therapies.

The formulation is delivered through billions of bundled together nanocapsules, which are smaller than a human blood cell, and prevents the bacteria from attaching to and infecting the stomach cells.

The team, which includes researchers from the universities of Leeds, Münster and Erlangen, hope the nanocapsules could be used as a preventative measure, as well as helping eradicate H. pylori and reduce antibiotic resistant strains.

Study co-author Professor Francisco Goycoolea from the School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds said: "Antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest challenges facing the world and it is predicted to cause more deaths than cancer by the year 2050 unless urgent action is taken.

"Helicobacter pylori is a globally-spread pathogen. It is estimated that up to 70% of people host this pathogen worldwide. The bacteria hide under the gastric mucus layer where antibiotics do not penetrate effectively. This often leads to recurrent infections and gives rise to resistant strains.

"New integral approaches are needed to tackle antimicrobial resistance and research into alternatives to antibiotics is vital. This novel formulation, consisting of small capsules made of natural ingredients, could offer a new means to deter a globally-spread 'superbug' pathogen."

The research, published in the journal ACS Applied Bio Materials, was carried out in vitro - using bacteria and stomach cells outside a human body.

The nanocapsules are loaded with curcumin - a natural compound found in turmeric which has well-documented anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties.

The capsules are coated with lysozyme, an enzyme that helps prevent bacterial infections, and a very low concentration of dextran sulfate, a water-soluble polysaccharide that binds receptors in the bacteria and in the mucosal layer that coats the stomach.

The nanopsules are bundled together in the required dose and the formulation prevents the bacteria from adhering to the stomach cells. The team has filed a patent based on this formulation.

Study co-author Professor Andreas Hensel from the Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry of University of Münster said: "Standard antibiotics used in today's clinical practice are quite broad acting compounds, disturbing cell wall architecture, protein formation of membrane integrity.

"A new generation of antibacterials might be based on more specific molecular targets of the bacteria, acting probably not as broad as the older compounds, but therefore more precisely against specific virulence factors of specific bacteria.

"The research published in ACS Applied Bio Materials might pinpoint a new way towards controlled drug targeting against H. pylori and its specific adhesion and virulence factors."
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Further information

The paper Low-molecular-weight dextran sulfate nanocapsules inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastric cells is published in ACS Applied Bio Materials 17 October 2019 (DOI: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsabm.9b00523)

Full list of authors: Bianca Menchicchi, Eleni Savvaidou, Christian Thöle, Andreas Hensel, Francisco M. Goycoolea

Patent reference number: MX/a/2015/006991

Statistics

Antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest challenges facing the world and it is predicted to cause more deaths than cancer by the year 2050 unless urgent actions are taken today.

Source: O'Neill J. Tackling Drug-Resistant Infections Globally: Final Report and Recommendations. The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance. Welcome Trust-HM Government. May 2016. https://amr-review.org/Publications.html

Contact

For additional information please contact University of Leeds press office on pressoffice@leeds.ac.uk or +44(0)113 343 4031

University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK, with more than 38,000 students from more than 150 different countries, and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities. The University plays a significant role in the Turing, Rosalind Franklin and Royce Institutes.

We are a top ten university for research and impact power in the UK, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, and are in the top 100 of the QS World University Rankings 2019.

The University was awarded a Gold rating by the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework in 2017, recognising its 'consistently outstanding' teaching and learning provision. Twenty-six of our academics have been awarded National Teaching Fellowships - more than any other institution in England, Northern Ireland and Wales - reflecting the excellence of our teaching. http://www.leeds.ac.uk

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