Adults with undiagnosed Celiac disease have lower bone density, says first study on topic

October 17, 2019

Fairfax, VA - Research by George Mason University College of Health and Human Services found that adults who likely had undiagnosed celiac disease (UCD) had lower bone density than the adults without UCD, although they consumed more calcium and phosphorous. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease triggered by consuming gluten, and individuals with CD are often undiagnosed. This is the first known study of bone health of U.S. adults with untreated UCD.

Lara Sattgast* and Drs. Margaret Slavin, Cara Frankenfeld, and Sina Gallo led the research published in Journal of the American College of Nutrition. They found that adults with UCD had lower bone density in their thighbones and femur necks--the top of the femur and most common site for hip fractures.

"Our findings suggest that lower bone density among adults with UCD is not a result of their diets, and in fact, they took in more calories and nutrients than the control group," Sattgast explains. "This may mean that these adults are not correctly absorbing nutrients."

The study used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2009 to 2014, including its dietary component--What We Eat in America (WWEIA). In this study, data on more than 13,000 adults who were not pregnant or eating a gluten-free diet were used.

"The time to diagnosis for celiac disease has improved in recent years, but still typically takes several years between the first symptoms and diagnosis," Slavin explains. "If someone suspects that they may have celiac disease, it is important they see a doctor to both get the proper diagnosis and treatment and not self-initiate a gluten-free diet on their own."

This study provides further support for monitoring bone health of individuals with celiac disease. The researchers suggest that future work should explore optimal levels for consuming and/or supplementing nutrients for bone health and whether poor absorption in the small intestine fully explains the differences observed in bone health or whether other metabolic pathways are impacted.
-end-
* Lara Sattgast was a Master of Science in Nutrition student during the completion of this publication and is currently a doctoral student at Oregon State University.

About George Mason University

George Mason University is Virginia's largest and most diverse public research university. Located near Washington, D.C., Mason enrolls 37,000 students from 130 countries and all 50 states. Mason has grown rapidly over the past half-century and is recognized for its innovation and entrepreneurship, remarkable diversity and commitment to accessibility. For more information, visit https://www2.gmu.edu/.

About the College of Health and Human Services

George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services prepares students to become leaders and shape the public's health through academic excellence, research of consequence, and interprofessional practice. The College enrolls 1,917 undergraduate students and 950 graduate students in its nationally recognized offerings, including: 5 undergraduate degrees, 12 graduate degrees, and 11 certificate programs. The College is transitioning to a college public health in the near future. For more information, visit https://chhs.gmu.edu/.

George Mason University

Related Nutrition Articles from Brightsurf:

Here's how to improve packaged foods nutrition
FOP nutrition labeling results in a significant improvement in the nutritional quality of food products.

'Front of package' nutrition labels improved nutrition quality
A new study analyzing 16 years of data on tens of thousands of products finds that the adoption of nutrition data on ''front of package'' labels is associated with improved nutritional content of those foods and their competitors.

Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.

Fathers are more likely to be referred for nutrition or exercise counseling
Fatherhood status has been linked to medical providers' weight-related practices or counseling referrals.

Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers
Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Leaders call for 'Moonshot' on nutrition research
Leading nutrition and food policy experts outline a bold case for strengthening federal nutrition research in a live interactive session as part of NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a virtual conference hosted by the American Society for Nutrition (ASN).

Featured research from NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE
Press materials are now available for NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a dynamic virtual event showcasing new research findings and timely discussions on food and nutrition.

Diet, nutrition have profound effects on gut microbiome
A new literature review from scientists at George Washington University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology suggests that nutrition and diet have a profound impact on the microbial composition of the gut.

Are women getting adequate nutrition during preconception and pregnancy?
In a Maternal & Child Nutrition analysis of published studies on the dietary habits of women who were trying to conceive or were pregnant, most studies indicated that women do not meet nutritional recommendations for vegetable, cereal grain, or folate intake.

Supermarkets and child nutrition in Africa
Hunger and undernutrition are widespread problems in Africa. At the same time, overweight, obesity, and related chronic diseases are also on the rise.

Read More: Nutrition News and Nutrition Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.