Nav: Home

HARP eclipses CLIP in continuous, rapid and large-scale SLA 3D printing

October 17, 2019

Objects can be continuously printed from a vat of photocurable resin at rates exceeding 430 millimeters per hour, thanks to a new approach to rapid and large-scale stereolithographic 3d printing (SLA). The method overcomes the challenges imposed by heat buildup from curing resin, which has limited the capabilities of previous iterations of continuous SLA 3d printing. Stereolithographic printing is a widely used method in commercial 3d printing. It relies on UV light to harden photoreactive resins into complex 3d shapes. A variation of SLA called CLIP allows for continuous photopolymerization of an object as it's pulled from the resin by introducing an oxygen permeable "dead-layer" where resin cannot cure, thus preventing adhesion between the emerging print and the UV interface at the bottom of the vat. However, the rapid polymerization of resin generates a lot of heat, and without adequate cooling, temperatures can quickly exceed the smoke point of the resin. Here, David Walker and colleagues present HARP, an approach free of the "dead-layer" that uses a flowing layer of fluorinated oil as a liquid-interface between the resin and UV interface. According to Walker et al., the flowing oil can be used as a heat exchanger to remove excess heat to maintain appropriate operational temperatures. What's more, the method is compatible with a wider range of resins, such as those normally reactive to oxygen. The authors demonstrate HARP's capabilities by printing objects in hard plastics, ceramics and elastomers.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Temperatures Articles:

New 'refrigerator' super-cools molecules to nanokelvin temperatures
MIT physicists have found a way to cool molecules of sodium lithium down to 200 billionths of a Kelvin, just a hair above absolute zero.
An alloy that retains its memory at high temperatures
Even after the hundredth time the material returns to its original shape when heated.
New catalysts remove NOx pollutants at lower temperatures
Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a low-temperature catalyst for removing NOx gas from industrial exhaust using ammonia.
Cold temperatures linked to high status
Researchers have discovered that people associate cold temperatures with luxury items, which is important for companies that are trying to promote products that convey high status.
Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures
Scientists at Stanford have identified molecules that tough microbes use to survive in warming waters, opening a window more broadly into studying conditions in ancient seas.
Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments
Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments.
Changes in rainfall and temperatures have already impacted water quality
Changes in temperature and precipitation have already impacted the amount of nitrogen introduced into US waterways.
Study: How will tropical mammals react to rising temperatures?
How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but one of the first studies to compare the responses of tropical mammals to warmer habitats suggests the answer won't be as simple as 'move to a cooler place.'
Plants grow less in hotter temperatures
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how two transcription factors, ANAC044 and ANAC085, pause the cell cycle when cells experience stress.
Catalyst advance removes pollutants at low temperatures
Researchers at Washington State University, University of New Mexico, Eindhoven University of Technology, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a catalyst that can both withstand high temperatures and convert pollutants at near room temperature -- an important advance for reducing pollution in modern cars.
More Temperatures News and Temperatures Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.