Chemical & Engineering News launches Analytical SCENE news channel

October 18, 2010

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18, 2010 -- Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society (ACS), today launched its latest news channel, the Analytical SCENE. ACS is the world's largest scientific society.

The channel is a stream of news articles about analytical research and business, including coverage of cutting-edge measurement methodology, new chemical sensors, the latest spectroscopic techniques, and instrumentation companies' recent moves. Drawing on content from the pages of C&EN, the news channel also contains its own original reporting, significantly expanding the magazine's coverage of analytical research. Readers will have free access to all of the stories on the Analytical SCENE even if they do not have a subscription to C&EN.

The Analytical SCENE joins the Environmental SCENE as C&EN's latest news channel. Additional topical channels are planned for 2011.
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For the latest updates, go to www.cen-online.org/analytical

The American Chemical Society is a non-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

American Chemical Society

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