Innovative early-career engineering faculty selected to participate in NAE's second frontiers of engineering education symposium

October 18, 2010

WASHINGTON - Fifty-three of the nation's most innovative young engineering educators have been selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering's second Frontiers of Engineering Education (FOEE) symposium. Early-career faculty members who are developing and implementing innovative educational approaches in a variety of engineering disciplines will come together for the 2-1/2-day event, where they can share ideas, learn from research and best practice in education, and leave with a charter to bring about improvement in their home institution. The attendees were nominated by fellow engineers or deans and chosen from a highly competitive pool of applicants.

"The Frontiers of Engineering Education program creates a unique venue for engineering faculty members to share and explore interesting and effective innovations in teaching and learning," said NAE President Charles M. Vest. "We intend for FOEE to become a major force in identifying, recognizing, and promulgating advances and innovations in order to build a strong intellectual infrastructure and commitment to 21st-century engineering education."

This year's program will focus on ways to ensure that students learn the engineering fundamentals, the expanding knowledge base of new technology, and the skills necessary to be an effective engineer or engineering researcher. "In our increasingly global and competitive world, the United States needs to marshal its resources to address the strategic shortfall of engineering leaders in the next decades," said Edward F. Crawley, Ford Professor of Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the chair of the FOEE planning committee. "By holding this event, we have recognized some of the finest young engineering educators in the nation, and will better equip them to transform the educational process at their universities."

The symposium will be held Dec. 13-16 in Irvine, Calif.

The following engineering faculty members were selected as attendees:The planning committee members of the 2010 symposium are:
-end-
The 2010 Frontiers of Engineering Education symposium is sponsored by the O'Donnell Foundation.

The National Academy of Engineering is an independent, nonprofit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology. Its members consist of the nation's premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for their distinguished achievements. Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863.

Contacts: Randy Atkins, Senior Media/Public Relations Officer
202-334-1508; atkins@nae.edu

Beth Cady, Associate Program Officer
202-334-2064; ecady@nae.edu
National Academy of Engineering

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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