Soil moisture for crop health topic of symposium

October 18, 2016

October 18, 2016- Soil moisture sensing through either contact or remote technology captures soil-plant-water information that relates closely with plant water availability and use. Innovations in remote sensing technologies can inform plant health assessments and more.

The "Soil Moisture Sensing for Crop Health Assessment and Management" symposium planned at the Resilience Emerging from Scarcity and Abundance ASA, CSSA, SSSA International Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ, will address this important topic. The symposium will be held Monday, November 7, 2016 at 8AM. The meeting is sponsored by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and the Soil Science Society of America.

The session addresses measures of soil moisture and their relationship with: Participants will gain insights into opportunities for improving crop productivity in relation to soil moisture status. The symposium reflects a mix of invited speakers from federal, university and commercial researchers. They will speak of the innovations and wide research interests in applying remote sensing technologies to estimate soil moisture in agriculture.

Speakers include Jerry Hatfield, USDA-ARS; John Shriver, Planetary Resources; Maik Wolleben, Skaha Remote Sensing; Haly Neely, Texas A&M; and, more. Results from the testing of new types of soil moisture probes and techniques will be presented, including microwave sensors developed for UAV use.

For more information about the Resilience Emerging from Scarcity and Abundance 2016 meeting, visit https://www.acsmeetings.org/. Media are invited to attend the conference. Pre-registration by Oct. 26, 2016 is required. Visit https://www.acsmeetings.org/media for registration information. For information about the "Soil Moisture Sensing for Crop Health Assessment and Management" symposium, visit https://scisoc.confex.com/scisoc/2016am/webprogram/Session15750.html.

To speak with one of the scientists, contact Susan V. Fisk, 608-273-8091, sfisk@sciencesocieties.org to arrange an interview.
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American Society of Agronomy

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