Nav: Home

New study: Estimated burden of healthcare-associated infections

October 18, 2016

A study published today by PLOS Medicine, estimates the combined burden of six healthcare-associated infections as being higher than that of diseases such as influenza, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis together. More than 2.5 million cases of healthcare-associated infections occurring each year in the EU/EEA are estimated to result in a burden of approximately 2.5 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), a commonly used metric for measuring the impact of diseases on the health of a population.

The authors said: "even though many of the reported healthcare-associated infections can be prevented by sustained and multifaceted actions, they still represent a significant burden among communicable diseases in Europe. Lowering the burden of healthcare-associated infections in the EU/EEA should be an achievable goal". They concluded: "the present study highlights the need for intensified efforts to prevent and control these infections, ultimately making European hospitals safer places."

The study builds on the methodology of the Burden of Communicable Diseases in Europe (BCoDE) project and the related toolkit, and on data from the ECDC point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals, for six common types of healthcare-associated infections: pneumonia, urinary tract infections, surgical site infections, Clostridium difficile infections, neonatal sepsis, and primary bloodstream infections.

While there were significant challenges in estimating the number of DALYs for healthcare-associated infections (e.g. adjusting for the role of comorbidities, the availability of data on the infectious events), the authors present a solid first attempt at estimating the burden of these infections.
-end-
The study was developed by experts at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the Robert Koch Institute (Germany), and the Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (The Netherlands).

Burden of six healthcare-associated infections on European population health: estimating incidence-based disability-adjusted life years through a population prevalence-based modelling study

Burden of Communicable Diseases in Europe (BCoDE)

Burden of Communicable Disease in Europe (BCoDE) toolkitECDC point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)

Related Tuberculosis Articles:

Old target, new mechanism for overcoming tuberculosis resistance
In strains of tuberculosis that have developed drug resistance mutations, researchers have identified a secondary pathway that can be activated to reinstate drug sensitivity.
Researchers use tiny 3-D spheres to combat tuberculosis
Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new 3-D system to study human infection in the laboratory.
How the tuberculosis vaccine may protect against other diseases
The tuberculosis vaccine is well known to help protect against other infectious diseases, as well as cancer, but the exact mechanisms have not been clear.
Tuberculosis bacteria find their ecological niche
An international team of researchers have isolated and analyzed genetically tuberculosis bacteria from several thousand patients from over a hundred countries.
Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection
The HIV virus increases the potency of the tuberculosis bacterium (Mtb) by affecting a central function of the immune system.
Scientists explain why Russian tuberculosis is the most infectious
Scientists conducted a large-scale analysis of the proteins and genomes of mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that are common in Russia and countries of the former Soviet Union and found features that provide a possible explanation for their epidemiological success.
Tuberculosis elimination at stake
New data released by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and WHO/Europe show that an estimated 340,000 Europeans developed tuberculosis in 2014, corresponding to a rate of 37 cases per 100,000 population.
Curcumin may help overcome drug-resistant tuberculosis
New research indicates that curcumin -- a substance in turmeric that is best known as one of the main components of curry powder -- may help fight drug-resistant tuberculosis.
Stopping tuberculosis requires new strategy
Unless there is a major shift in the way the world fights tuberculosis -- from a reliance on biomedical solutions to an approach that combines biomedical interventions with social actions -- the epidemic and drug resistance will worsen, say researchers at Harvard T.H.
Tulane researchers working on new tuberculosis vaccine
Researchers at the Tulane National Primate Research Center are leading efforts to find a new vaccine for tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest diseases.

Related Tuberculosis Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...